Anonymous Emails Between On-Premises and Exchange Online

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Authentication, EOP, exchange, exchange online, Exchange Online Protection, Exchange Server, hybrid, smtp, spam

When you set up Exchange Hybrid, it should configure your Exchange organizations (both on-premises and cloud) to support the fact that an email from a person in one of the organizations should appear as internal to a recipient in the other organization. In Outlook that means you will see “Display Name” at the top of the message and not “Display Name” <email address>. An email from the internet is rightly treated as anonymous and so should appear as “Display Name” <email address> but when it comes from your on-premises environment or your cloud tenant it should be authenticated.

In the email headers you should see a header called AuthAs that reads internal. The SCL (Spam Confidence Level) should always be –1 and you should not have a header called X-CrossPremisesHeadersFilteredBySendConnector visible on internal emails.

Your hybrid setup can be incorrectly configured and cause this, and depending upon what Exchange Server version you are running and when you last ran the hybrid wizard you can end up with different results.

Lets take a quick view to some of the settings you should see:

  1. Exchange Server 2010 (with or without Edge Server 2010)
    1. Hybrid wizard will use Remote Domains to control internal vs external and authentication state. You should have a Remote Domain for tenant.mail.onmicrosoft.com that shows TNEFEnabled, TrustedMailOutboundEnabled, TargetDeliverDomain, and IsInternal all set to True on-premises
    2. TrustedMailnboundEnabled attribute is set to True on Get-RemoteDomain domain.com in the cloud
    3. The AllowedOOFType, which controls Out Of Office is set to InternalLegacy
  2. Exchange Server 2013 and later
    1. Your “Outbound to Office 365” send connector on-premises should have CloudServicesMailEnabled set to True
    2. The Remote Domains matter for Out of Office and moderated emails/voting buttons, but not for authentication as mentioned in #1 above
    3. The Inbound Connector for “Inbound from GUID” should have CloudServicesMailEnabled set to True
  3. Exchange Server 2010 with Exchange Server 2013 or later Edge (no 2013 on-premises, only Edge)
    1. The setting CloudServicesMailEnabled needs to be True, but 2010 does not support this setting, so you need to edit the directory using ADSIEdit and change the msExchSmtpSendFlags on the send connector from 64 to 131136. All this does is tell the 2013 or later Edge to enable CloudServicesMailEnabled
    2. See https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3212872/email-sent-from-an-on-premises-exchange-2013-edge-transport-server-to for the steps to do this
  4. As #3 but with 2010 and 2013 on-premises – run the cmdlets and hybrid wizard from the 2013 server and not connected to the 2010 server!

Send-On-Behalf Permissions in Exchange Online

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in exchange, exchange online, Exchange Server, hybrid, permissions, send-on-behalf

This document is up to date as of March 2018 and is therefore unlike many earlier documents on this issue as this feature set is in the process of changing.

First, Send-On-Behalf is changing so that it is supported across a hybrid Exchange Server to Exchange Online connection. At the time of writing this is in the process of being rolled out, so it might well be in your tenant by the time you read this.

But even if the config for this is enabled in the cloud, there is config that is needed on-premises. In Exchange Server 2013 you need to be on the latest CU and then run Set-OrganizationConfig  -ACLableSyncedObjectEnabled $True (as mentioned in https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt784505%28v=exchg.150%29.aspx). For Exchange 2010, this is not an option (and the ACL sync needs to be done manually) and for Exchange 2016 this cmdlet is enabled already. [Note, discovered April 2018 that this is not true, and Exchange Server 2016 needs treating in the same way as Exchange Server 2013 regardless of what the Microsoft article says at the time of writing]

So what does -ACLableSyncedObjectEnabled $True do – well it changes Exchange Server so that all MoveRequests completed after the change leave behind a RemoteMailbox object where msExchRecipientDisplayType is -1073741818. For reference before the change to the OrganizationConfig this value on a RemoteMailbox was -2147483642.

msExchRecipientDisplayType Value
SyncedMailboxUser

-2147483642

ACLableSyncedMailboxUser

-1073741818

An ACLableSyncedMailboxUser is one that can have Send-On-Behalf permissions set or maintained across on-premise and the cloud – that is once your tenant is  updated as well.

This though leaves a few issues – the main one is that the RemoteMailbox left behind by the MoveRequest is only set to -1073741818 where the RemoteMailbox is made by a MoveRequest. If once you have moved all your users you start provisioning users directly in the cloud, then New-RemoteMailbox or Enable-RemoteMailbox will not set msExchRecipientDisplayType to -1073741818.

Therefore provisioning of users directly into the cloud with –RemoteMailbox will need the addition of Set-ADUser to update the msExchRecipientDisplayType after the RemoteMailbox is created. The cmdlet for this is the same cmdlet that you need to run if you are using Exchange 2010. This cmdlet is Get-AdUser <Identity> | Set-AdObject -Replace @{msExchRecipientDisplayType=-1073741818}

This  cmdlet would need to be added to your provisioning scripts, and if you don’t have scripts to provision users in AD and have a mailbox in the cloud, then now is the time to look at this as the number of moving parts is growing.

If you do not do the msExchRecipientDisplayType change then some of your remote mailboxes in Exchange Online will be able to be granted permissions for Send-On-Behalf and other permissions as they are added to the cloud, as they are ACLable (as in we can set them in Access Control Lists, ACLable!), and others users will not be. To make these changes you need to change the msExchRecipientDisplayType on-premises to -1073741818 and wait for this to sync to Azure AD and then wait for that to sync from Azure AD in the Forward Sync process to your Exchange Online directory.

Exchange Online Migration Batches–How Long Do They Exist For

Posted on 5 CommentsPosted in exchange, exchange online, Exchange Server, hybrid, microsoft, migration, Office 365

When you create a migration batch in Exchange Online, the default setting for a migration is to start the batch immediately and complete manually. So how long can you leave this batch before you need to complete it?

As you can see from the below screenshot, the migration batch here was created on Feb 19th, which was only yesterday as I write this blog.

image

The batch was created on the morning of the 19th Feb, and set to manual start (rather than the default of automatic start, as did not want to migrate lots of data during the business day) and then it was started close to 5:30pm that evening. By 11:25pm the batch had completed its initial sync of all 28 mailboxes and there were no failures. There were other batches syncing at the same time, so this is not indicative of any expected or determined migration performance speeds.

So what happens next. In the background a new mailbox move request was created for each mailbox in the batch, and each individual mailbox was synced to Exchange Online and associated with the synced Mail User object created in the cloud by the AADSync process. When each move reached 95% complete, the move was suspended. It will be resumed around 24 hours later, so that each mailbox is kept up to date once a day automatically.

If you leave the migration running but not completed you will see from the migration batch status above that the batch will complete in 7,981 years (on the 31st Dec 9999 and one second before the next millennium bug hits). In the meantime the migration batch sync will stop doing its daily updates after two months.

After two months of syncing to the cloud and not being completed, Exchange Online assumes you are still no closer to migrating and they stop keeping the mailbox on-premise and the mailbox in the cloud in sync. You can restart this process by interacting with the migration batch before this time, or if it does stop by just clicking the Resume icon, and this will restart it for a further period of time.

Office 365 Retention Policies and Hybrid Public Folders

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in exchange online, Exchange Server, hybrid, Office 365, Public Folders, retention, retention policies

If you create an Office 365 Retention Policy (in the Security and Compliance Center) that applies to all Exchange Online content then you might find that after the retention policy has been deployed (a day or so later usually) that the policy is in error and there is a message at the top of the retention policy pane that shows “1 distribution result(s) found”.

image

The “Notify support” link does nothing but help you call support, and a post on the Microsoft Tech Community implies that that does not help.

The place to look for the answer is in a Security and Compliance Remote PowerShell session. Here you can run Get-RetentionCompliancePolicy -DistributionDetail | fl Name,Distribution* to return the name of each of your retention policies along with the DistributionStatus (which will be “Error”) and DistributionResults.

In my example I found I had a DistributionResults message of “{[Exchange]AllPublicFolderUnderRoot:Recipient not found: }”.

image

In the example that I was trying to resolve this issue for, the Exchange Online organization was utilizing on-premises Public Folders for Exchange Online mailboxes. That is, in Exchange Online, the PublicFoldersEnabled property of Get-OrganizationConfig was set to remote and we had a few RemotePublicFolderMailboxes (aka mailboxes that proxy the online mailboxes connection to the on-premises organization).

image

Therefore there seems to be an error in Office 365 Retention Policies where the retention policy distribution fails when you set it to archive public folders, but your public folder infrastructure is still on-premises.

So what can you do – either you ignore the error, after all it is telling you that your retention does not include objects that do not yet exist – but when you do have public folders in Exchange Online, the retention policy should take effect without you doing anything else.

The other thing you could do is to to remove public folders as a retention source, not forgetting to enable it again when you have moved your public folders to the cloud.

image

Outbound Email Via Exchange Online Protection When Using Hybrid Exchange Online

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in dmarc, EOP, exchange, exchange online, Exchange Online Protection, Exchange Server, hybrid, mailbox, spf

In a long term hybrid scenario, where you have Exchange Online and Exchange Server configured and mailboxes on both, internet bound email from your on-premises servers can route in two general ways.

The first is outbound via whatever you had in place before you moved to Office 365. You might have configured Exchange Online to also route via this as well.

The second is to route Exchange Server outbound emails via Exchange Online Protection. Your Exchange Online configuration does not need to be adjusted for this to work, as the default route for all domains to the internet (or the * address space as it is known) is via EOP as long as you create no alternative outbound connector for *.

This blog post looks at configuring Exchange Server so that your on-premises mailboxes also route out via Exchange Online Protection, and does it without changing the connectors made by the hybrid wizard. If you change the hybrid wizard connectors and then run the wizard again, it will reset things to how it wants them to be, which will remove your configuration changes.

This configuration setup results in a single new send connector created on-premises in Exchange Server (or one connector per site is you route emails from more than one Active Directory site). This new connector is not the Outbound to Office 365 connector that the hybrid wizard creates and so changes here do not break hybrid and changes to the hybrid wizard do not impact outbound mail flow.

This blog post also assumes you already have a working route outbound for all internet emails and you are swapping over to outbound via EOP, so these steps work though ensuring that is correct and will work before changing the route for *.

Examine the hybrid send connector to Office 365

[PS] C:\ExchangeScripts\pfToO365>Get-SendConnector out* | fl

AddressSpaces:                  {smtp:domainuk.mail.onmicrosoft.com;1}
AuthenticationCredential :
CloudServicesMailEnabled :      True
Comment : ConnectedDomains :    {}
ConnectionInactivityTimeOut :   00:10:00
DNSRoutingEnabled :             True
DomainSecureEnabled :           False
Enabled :                       True
ErrorPolicies :                 Default
ForceHELO :                     False
Fqdn :                          mail.domain.uk
FrontendProxyEnabled : 	        False
HomeMTA :                       Microsoft MTA
HomeMtaServerId :               SERVER01
Identity :                      Outbound to Office 365
IgnoreSTARTTLS :                False
IsScopedConnector :             False
IsSmtpConnector :               True
MaxMessageSize :                35 MB (36,700,160 bytes)
Name :                          Outbound to Office 365
Port :                          25
ProtocolLoggingLevel :          None
RequireOorg :                   False
RequireTLS :                    True
SmartHostAuthMechanism :        None
SmartHosts :                    {}
SmartHostsString :
SmtpMaxMessagesPerConnection :  20
SourceIPAddress :               0.0.0.0
SourceRoutingGroup :            Exchange Routing Group (DWBGZMFD01QNBJR)
SourceTransportServers :        {SERVER02, SERVER01}
TlsAuthLevel :                  DomainValidation
TlsCertificateName :            <I>CN=GlobalSign Organization Validation CA - SHA256 - G2, O=GlobalSign 
                                nv-sa, C=BE;<S>CN=*.domain.uk, O=Acme Limited, L=London, S=London, C=GB
TlsDomain :                     mail.protection.outlook.com
UseExternalDNSServersEnabled :  False

The above PowerShell from the on-premises Exchange Management Shell shows you the hybrid send connector. As you can see this is set to route emails only for your hybrid address space (domainuk.mail.onmicrosoft.com in this example)

The other important attributes for EOP mail flow here are AddressSpaces, CloudServicesMailEnabled, DNSRoutingEnabled, Fqdn, RequireTLS, SmartHosts, and TLSAuthLevel. Setting these correctly on a new send connector will allow you to route other domains to EOP and then onward to the internet.

Create a new send connector

This blog is based upon information found in https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn751020(v=exchg.150).aspx but it differs from the scenario described there within. In this scenario, as you have already run the hybrid wizard, the connector to the cloud from on-premises and from the cloud to your servers already exists. Therefore all we need to do is create an additional send connector on-premises to route all the other domains to EOP and the internet.

New-SendConnector -Name <DescriptiveName> -AddressSpaces testdomain1.com,testdomain2.com -CloudServicesMailEnabled $true -Fqdn <CertificateHostNameValue> -RequireTLS $true -DNSRoutingEnabled $false -SmartHosts <YourDomain_MX_Value> -TlsAuthLevel  CertificateValidation -Usage Internet

In the above, the connector is originally created being able to route for two test domains (written as testdomainx.com above, comma separated in the list with no spaces). This ensures that you do not break your existing mail flow but allows you to test that the connector works and then later change the connector to support * address space. The “YourDomain_MX_Prefix” is the same value as you would use in your MX to route emails to Exchange Online (tenant-prefix-com.mail.protection.outlook.com for example).

Testing the connector

In the above new send connector, testdomain1.com is a domain hosted in a different Office 365 tenant. Testdomain2.com is a domain who’s email is not hosted in Office 365 at all. You need both test scenarios, as routing to domains inside Office 365 is more likely to work if the connector is not configured properly.

So from a mailbox on-premises, send an email to a recipient at both testdomain1.com and testdomain2.com. Do not set the connector up to use gmail or Outlook.com, as that will impact other senders within your organization. Use domains that no one else is likely to want to email.

Ensure that you do not get any NDR’s and check the recipient mailboxes to ensure delivery. Note that you are possibly likely to need to update your SPF record for the sending domain to additionally include the following:

  • include:spf.protection.outlook.com
  • ipv4:w.x.y.z (where w.x.y.z is the external IP address(es) of your on-premises Exchange transport servers)

Updating the connector

Once your mail flow tests work, and you can check the route by pasting the received message headers into http://exrca.com you should see that email routes into your Office 365 tenant, then leave EOP (the word “outbound” will be in one of the FQDNs – this server is on the external edge of EOP), then routed inbound to your email provider (or back into your recipient tenant).

Once mail flow works, you can either add more recipient domains to increase the scope of the test – for example add a domain that you email occasionally, such as the partner helping you with this work and a few other domains. Once all your testing is ready change this connector to have * as the address space and not list specific domains.

As your other connector for * is still up and running you will find that 50% of your email will use the new connector and 50% the old. Then you can disable the old connector to go 100% email outbound through EOP (you need an EOP licence per sender to do this, or if you have an Exchange Online licence for each user you are already covered).

Finally when you have been routing on-premises email through EOP for a few weeks with the old connector disabled, you can delete the old connector and tidy up the configuration rather than leaving disabled connectors around.

Configuring Hybrid Device Join On Active Directory with SSO

Posted on 15 CommentsPosted in Azure Active Directory, Azure AD, AzureAD, device, device registration, hybrid

The instructions from Microsoft at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/device-management-hybrid-azuread-joined-devices-setup are missing some of the steps on setting up hybrid device join to Azure AD. This is a complete list of steps when Pass-Thru auth with SSO is enabled on the domain.

  1. Enable SSO – this is covered elsewhere. You can also do hybrid device join on a federated domain, though this is not covered here.
  2. On your AADConnect server ensure that the MSOnline PowerShell add in is installed – this is the AdministrationConfig-3.msi executable that is needed to run cmdlets like Get-MSOLUser. Is only supported by the MSOnline PowerShell module version 1.1.166.0. To download this module, use this link
  3. Open an administrative PowerShell
  4. cd 'C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep'
  5. Import-Module .\AdSyncPrep.psm1
  6. This will enable the AD module and import some scripts for device writeback and device registration. We are looking at device registration here
  7. $aadAdminCred = Get-Credential

    #Enter a global admin credential

  8. Initialize-ADSyncDomainJoinedComputerSync –AdConnectorAccount [connector account name] -AzureADCredentials $aadAdminCred

    #[connector account name] is the name of your domain (domain.local for example) as shown in the AADConnect Synchronization Service Manager –

  9. You should see the message “Initializing your Active Directory forest to sync Windows 10 domain joined computers to Azure AD.” followed by “Configuration Complete”. Errors about Azure Registration mean you are running the wrong version of the Azure AD PowerShell cmdlets
  10. The required settings in AD (for one forest) are now done. If you have multiple forests, return to the above referenced document and run the script to register the Devices Registration Configuration node to AD
  11. If you have conditional access available (have at least one Azure AD Premium licence assigned to your admin account) then you can add Trusted Sites to Azure AD to control where MFA prompts for device join will happen outside of. Add each office public NATed IP address with /32 (or whatever is needed at the end) into Azure Active Directory (under portal.azure.com) > Conditional Access > Named Locations > New Location
    image
  12. Add the same IPs to the “Configure MFA trusted IPs” link on the same page that you see the IP’s listed above
  13. Your list of devices under Azure Active Directory should now increase as users reboot Windows 10 1703 machines and later. See the above document about the GPO setting needed to role this out to older versions of Windows (Workplace Join settings)

Administrators, AADConnect and AdminSDHolder Issues (or why are some accounts having permission-issue)

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in AADConnect, AADSync, active directory, AdminSDHolder, dirsync, exchange, exchange online, hybrid, Office 365

[Scripts updated 5th October 2017 to support updates for Exchange Hybrid Writeback. If you ran earlier versions of these scripts you will need to run them again]

AdminSDHolder is something I come across a lot, but find a lot of admins are unaware of it. In brief it is any user that is a member of a protected group (i.e. Domain Admins) will find that their AD permission inheritance and access control lists on their AD object will be reset every hour. Michael B. Smith did a nice write-up on this subject here.

AdminSDHolder is an AD object that determines what the permissions for all protected group members need to be. Why this matters with AADConnect and your sync to Azure Active Directory (i.e. the directory used by Office 365) is that any object that the AADConnect service cannot read cannot be synced, and any object that the AADConnect service cannot write to can be targeted by writeback permissions. This blog post was last updated 18th June 2017 in advance of the release of AADConnect version 1.1.553.0.

For the read permissions this is less of an issue, as the default read permissions by every object is part of a standard Active Directory deployment and so you will find that AdminSDHolder contains this permission and therefore protected objects can be read by AADConnect. This happens in reality becase Authenticated Users have read permissions to lots of attributes on the AdminSDHolder object under the hidden System containing in the domain. Unless your AD permissions are very locked down or AdminSDHolder permissions have been changed to remove Authenticated Users you should have no issue in syncing admin accounts, who of course might have dependencies on mailboxes and SharePoint sites etc. and so need to be synced to the cloud.

Writeback though is a different ball game. Unless you have done AADConnect with Express settings you will find that protected accounts fail during the last stage of AADConnect sync process. You often see errors in the Export profile for your Active Directory that list your admin accounts. Ofter the easiest way to fix this is to enable the Inheritance permission check box on the user account and sync again. The changes are now successfully written but within the hour this inheritance checkbox will be removed and the default permissions as set on AdminSDHolder reapplied to these user accounts. Later changes that need written back from the cloud will result in a failure to writeback again, and again permission issues will be to blame.

To fix this we just need to ensure that the AdminSDHolder object has the correct permissions needed. This is nothing more than doing what the AADConnect Express wizard will do for you anyway, but if you don’t do the Express wizard I don’t think I have seen what you should do documented anywhere – so this is the first (maybe).

Often if you don’t run Express settings you are interested in the principal of least privilege and so the rest of this blog post will outline what you will see in your Active Directory and what to do to ensure protected accounts will always sync and writeback in the Azure Active Directory sync engine. I covered the permissions to enable various types of writeback permissions in a different blog post, but the scripts in this post never added the correct write permissions to AdminSDHolder, so this post will cover what to do for your protected accounts.

First, take a look at any protected account (i.e. one that is a member of Domain Admins):
image

You will see in the Advanced permissions dialog that their is an “Enable Inheritance” button (or a check box is unchecked in older versions of Active Directory. You will also notice that all the permissions under the “Inherited From” column read “None” – that is there are no permissions inherited. You will also see, as shown in the above dialog, that if Express settings have been run for your AADConnect sync service that a access control entry for the AADConnect service account will be listed – here this is MSOL_924f68d9ff1f (yours will be different if it exists) and has read/write for everything. This is not least privilege! If you have run the sync engine previously on different servers and later removed them (as the sync engine can only run on one server to one AAD tenant, excluding staging servers) then you might see more than one MSOL account. The description field of the account will show what server it was created on for your information.

If you compare your above admin account to a non-protected account you will see inheritance can be disabled and that the Inherited From column lists the source of the permission inheritance.

Compare the access control entries (ACE) to the list of ACE’s on the AdminSDHolder object. AdminSDHolder can be found at CN=AdminSDHolder,CN=System,DC=domain,DC=local. You should find that the protected accounts match those of the AdminSDHolder, or at least will within the hour as someone could have just changed something.

Add a permission ACE to AdminSDHolder and it will appear on each protected account within an hour, remove an ACE and it will go within the hour as well. So you could for example remove the MSOL_ account(s) from older ADSync deployments and tidy up your permissions as well.

This is what my Advanced permissions for AdminSDHolder looks like on my domain

image

If I add the relevant ACE’s here for the writeback permissions then within the hour, and then for syncs that happen after that time, the errors for writeback in the sync management console will go away. Note though that AdminSDHolder is per domain, so if you are syncing more than one domain you need to set these permissions on each domain.

To script these permissions, run the following in PowerShell to update AD permissions regarding to the different hybrid writebacks scenarios that you are interested in implementing.

Finding All Your AdminSDHolder Affected Users

The following PowerShell will let you know all the users in your domain who have an AdminCount set to 1 (>0 in reality), which means they are impacted by AdminSDHolder restrictions. The changes below directly on the AdminSDHolder will impact these users as their permissions will get updated to allow writeback from Azure AD.

get-aduser -Filter {admincount -gt 0} -Properties adminCount -ResultSetSize $null | FT DistinguishedName,Enabled,SamAccountName

SourceAnchor Writeback

This setting is needed for all installations since version 1.1.553.0.

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is an account usually in the form of AAD_number or MSOL_number].
$AdminSDHolder = "CN=AdminSDHolder,CN=System,DC=contoso,DC=com"

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;ms-ds-consistencyGuid'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Password Writeback

The following PowerShell will modify the permissions on the AdminSDHolder object so that protected accounts can have Self Service Password Reset (SSPR) function against the accounts. Note you need to change the DC values in the script for it to function against your domain(s).

Note that if you implement this, I recommend that you use version 1.1.553 or later, as that version restricts rogue Azure AD admins from resetting other Active Directory admins passwords and then taking ownership of the Active Directory account. Often Azure AD admins have admin rights in AD, and so this was always possible independent of AADConnect, but versions of AADConnect prior to 1.1.553 would allow an Azure AD admin to reset a restricted AD account that they did not own.

To determine the account name that permissions must be granted to, open the Synchronization Service Manager on the sync server, click Connectors and double click the connector to the domain you are updating. Under the Connect to Active Directory Forest item you will see the Forest Name and User Name. The User Name is the name of the account you need in the script. An example is shown below:

image

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is an account usually in the form of AAD_number or MSOL_number].
$AdminSDHolder = "CN=AdminSDHolder,CN=System,DC=contoso,DC=com"

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Reset Password`"'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Change Password`"'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;lockoutTime'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;pwdLastSet'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Exchange Hybrid Mode Writeback

The below script will set the permissions required for the service account that AADSync uses. Note that if Express mode has been used, then an account called MSOL_AD_Sync_RichCoexistence will exist that has these permissions rather than being assigned directly to the sync account. Therefore you could change the below permissions to utilise MSOL_AD_Sync_RichCoexistence rather than AAD_ or MSOL_ and achieve the same results, but knowing that future changes to the MSOL_ or AAD_ account will be saved as it was done via a group.

The final permission in the set is for msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID and this is part of the Exchange Server 2016 (and maybe Exchange Server 2013 later CU’s) schema updates. Newer documentation on AAD Connect synchronized attributes already has this attribute listed, for example in Azure AD Connect sync: Attributes synchronized to Azure Active Directory

$accountName = "domain\aad_account"
$AdminSDHolder = "CN=AdminSDHolder,CN=System,DC=contoso,DC=com"

$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUCVoiceMailSettings'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUserHoldPolicies'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchArchiveStatus'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeSendersHash'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchBlockedSendersHash'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeRecipientsHash'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;publicDelegates'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$AdminSDHolder' /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchDelegateLinkList'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Once these two scripts are run against AdminSDHolder object and you wait an hour, the permissions will be applied to your protected accounts, then within 30 minutes (based on the default sync time) any admin account that is failing to get cloud settings written back to Active Directory due to permission-issue errors will automatically get resolved.

Unable To Remove Office 365 Domain Error

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in dirsync, exchange online, hybrid, IAmMEC, MSOL, Office 365, powershell

If you need to remove a domain from Office 365 it needs to not be in use. This includes the services that use that domain, for example an Accepted Domain in Exchange Online. If though you have an expired, maybe test, Office 365 tenant and you want to remove a domain from it you may find unhelpful error messages. For example I have seen in the domain removal process in the portal a message saying “Please don’t close this page while we remove your domain” etc. It tries for several minutes as it predicts, but did not complete:

image

Upon failing to complete you get a further warning before it finally gives up and tells you that it cannot complete:

image

So the obvious next step (or obvious to me anyway) is to try the removal in remote PowerShell to Office 365. The cmdlet is Remove-MsolDomain -DomainName domain.com but this comes back with with messages that might be helpful, but after repeated running of the cmdlet and fixing the error still suggests the same fix.

image

The error reads: Remove-MsolDomain : Unable to remove this domain. Use Get-MsolUser -DomainName <domain name>  to retrieve a list  of objects that are blocking removal. The problem with this error is the list of objects here are only user accounts and not any of the other objects that could block a domain removal.

So sure, remove your unneeded users or change their UPN/email address to not include this domain that you want to remove, but also run Get-MsolContact and Get-MsolGroup and then remove or edit the contacts and the groups that use this domain.

So though the error says to fix the user objects that are blocking domain removal, you also need to fix or remove the groups and contacts as well.

Configuring Writeback Permissions in Active Directory for Azure Active Directory Sync

Posted on 45 CommentsPosted in 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, active directory, ADFS 3.0, Azure, Azure Active Directory, cloud, exchange, exchange online, groups, hybrid, IAmMEC, Office 365, WAP, Web Application Proxy, windows

[This blog post was last updated 5th October 2017 – added support to Exchange Hybrid for msExchDelegateLinkList attribute which was announced at Microsoft Ignite 2017 for the support of keeping auto-mapping working cross on-premises and the cloud]

[Updated 18th June 2017 in advance of the release of AADConnect version 1.1.553.0. This post contains updates to the below scripts to include the latest attributes synced back to on-premises including publicDelegates, which is used for supporting bi-directional sync for “Send on Behalf” of permissions in Exchange Online/Exchange Server hybrid writeback scenarios]

[Update March 2017 – added another blog post on using the below to fix permission-issue errors on admin and other protected accounts at http://c7solutions.com/2017/03/administrators-aadconnect-and-adminsdholder-issues]

Azure Active Directory has been long the read-only cousin of Active Directory for those Office 365 and Azure users who sync their directory from Active Directory to Azure Active Directory apart from eight attributes for Exchange Server hybrid mode. Not any more. Azure Active Directory writeback is now available and in preview for some of the writeback types at the time of writing. This enabled objects to be mastered or changed in Azure Active Directory and written back to on-premises Active Directory.

This writeback includes:

  • Devices that can be enrolled with Office 365 MDM or Intune, which will allow login to AD FS controlled resources based on user and the device they are on
  • “Modern Groups” in Office 365 can be written back to on-premises Exchange Server 2013 CU8 or later hybrid mode and appear as mail enabled distribution lists on premises. Does not require AAD Premium licences
  • Users can change their passwords via the login page or user settings in Office 365 and have that password written back online.
  • Exchange Server hybrid writeback is the classic writeback from Azure AD and is the apart from Group Writeback is the only one of these writebacks that does not require Azure AD Premium licences.
  • User writeback from Azure AD (i.e. users made in Office 365 in the cloud for example) to on-premises Active Directory
  • Windows 10 devices for “Azure AD Domain Join” functionality

All of these features (apart from Exchange Hybrid writeback) require AADConnect and not and of the earlier verions (which will be actively blocked by the end of 2017 anyway). Install and run the AADConnect program to migrate from DirSync to AADSync and then in the Synchronization Options on rerunning the AADConnect wizard you can add all these writeback functions.

In all the below sections you need to grant permission to the connector account. You can find the connector account for your Active Directory forest from the Synchronization Service program > Connectors > double-click your domain > select Connect to Active Directory Forest. The account listed here is the connector account you need to grant permissions to.

SourceAnchor Writeback

For users with (typically) multi-forest deployments or plans or a forest migration, the objectGuid value in Active Directory, which is used as the source for the attribute that keys your on-premises object to your synced cloud object – in AAD sync parlance, this is known as the SourceAnchor. If you set up AADConnect version 1.1.553.0 or later you can opt to change from objectGuid to a new source anchor attribute known as ms-ds-consistencyGuid. To be able to use this new feature you need the ability for AADConnect connector account to be able to read ObjectGUID and then write it back to ms-ds-consistencyGuid. The read permissions are typically available to the connector account without doing anything special, and if AADConnect is installed in Express Mode it will get the write permissions it needs, but as with the rest of this blog, if you are not using Express Mode you need to grant the permissions manually and so write permissions are needed to the ms-ds-consistencyGuid attribute. This can be done with this script.


$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$ForestDN = "DC=contoso,DC=com"

$cmd = "dsacls '$ForestDN' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;ms-ds-consistencyGuid;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Note that if you use ms-ds-consistencyGuid then there are changes required on your ADFS deployment as well. The Issuance Transform Rules for the Office 365 Relying Party Trust contains a rule that specifies the ImmutableID (aka AADConnect SourceAnchor) that the user will be identified as for login. By default this is set to ObjectGUID, and if you use AADConnect to set up ADFS for you then the application will update the rule. But if you set up ADFS yourself then you need to update the rule.

Issuance Transform Rules

When Office 365 is configured to federate a domain (use ADFS for authentication of that domain and not Azure AD) then the following are the claims rules that exist out of the box need to be adjusted. This is to support the use of ms-ds-consistencyguid as the immutable ID.

ADFS Management UI > Trust Relationships > Relying Party Trusts

Select Microsoft Office 365 Identity Platform > click Edit Claim Rules

You get two or three rules listed here. You get three rules if you use -SupportMultipleDomain switch in Convert-MSOLDomainToFederated.
Rule 1:
Change objectGUID to ms-DS-ConsistencyGUID
Rule Was:
c:[Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname”]
=> issue(store = “Active Directory”, types = (“http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/claims/UPN”, “http://schemas.microsoft.com/LiveID/Federation/2008/05/ImmutableID”), query = “samAccountName={0};userPrincipalName,objectGUID;{1}”, param = regexreplace(c.Value, “(?<domain>[^\\]+)\\(?<user>.+)”, “${user}”), param = c.Value);
New Value:
c:[Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname”]
=> issue(store = “Active Directory”, types = (“http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/claims/UPN”, “http://schemas.microsoft.com/LiveID/Federation/2008/05/ImmutableID”), query = “samAccountName={0};userPrincipalName,ms-DS-ConsistencyGUID;{1}”, param = regexreplace(c.Value, “(?<domain>[^\\]+)\\(?<user>.+)”, “${user}”), param = c.Value);

Preparing for Device Writeback

If you do not have a 2012 R2 or later domain controller then you need to update the schema of your forest. Do this by getting a Windows Server 2012 R2 ISO image and mounting it as a drive. Copy the support/adprep folder from this image or DVD to a 64 bit domain member in the same site as the Schema Master. Then run adprep /forestprep from an admin cmd prompt when logged in as a Schema Admin. The domain member needs to be a 64 bit domain joined machine for adprep.exe to run.

Wait for the schema changes to replicate around the network.

Import the cmdlets needed to configure your Active Directory for writeback by running Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session. You need Azure AD Global Admin and Enterprise Admin permissions for Azure and local AD forest respectively. The cmdlets for this are obtained by running the Azure AD Connect tool.


$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
Initialize-ADSyncDeviceWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -DomainName contoso.com #[domain where devices will be created].

This will create the “Device Registration Services” node in the Configuration partition of your forest as shown:

image

To see this, open Active Directory Sites and Services and from the View menu select Show Services Node. Also in the domain partition you should now see an OU called RegisteredDevices. The AADSync account now has permissions to write objects to this container as well.

In Azure AD Connect, if you get the error “This feature is disabled because there is no eligible forest with appropriate permissions for device writeback” then you need to complete the steps in this section and click Previous in the AADConnect wizard to go back to the “Connect your directories” page and then you can click Next to return to the “Optional features” page. This time the Device Writeback option will not be greyed out.

Device Writeback needs a 2012 R2 or later AD FS server and WAP to make use of the device info in the Active Directory (for example, conditional access to resources based on the user and the device they are using). Once Device Writeback is prepared for with these cmdlets and the AADConnect Synchronization Options page is enabled for Device Writeback then the following will appear in Active Directory:

image

Not shown in the above, but adding the Display Name column in Active Directory Users and Computers tells you the device name. The registered owner and registered users of the device are available to view, but as they are SID values, they are not really readable.

If you have multiple forests, then you need add the SCP record for the tenant name in each separate forest. The above will do it for the forest AADConnect is installed in and the below script can be used to add the SCP to other forests:

$verifiedDomain = "contoso.com"  # Replace this with any of your verified domain names in Azure AD
$tenantID = "27f998bf-86f2-41bf-91ab-2d7ab011df35"  # Replace this with you tenant ID
$configNC = "CN=Configuration,DC=corp,DC=contoso,DC=com"  # Replace this with your AD configuration naming context
$de = New-Object System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry
$de.Path = "LDAP://CN=Services," + $configNC
$deDRC = $de.Children.Add("CN=Device Registration Configuration", "container")
$deDRC.CommitChanges()
$deSCP = $deDRC.Children.Add("CN=62a0ff2e-97b9-4513-943f-0d221bd30080", "serviceConnectionPoint")
$deSCP.Properties["keywords"].Add("azureADName:" + $verifiedDomain)
$deSCP.Properties["keywords"].Add("azureADId:" + $tenantID)
$deSCP.CommitChanges()

Preparing for Group Writeback

Writing Office 365 “Modern Groups” back to Active Directory on-premises requires Exchange Server 2013 CU8 or later schema updates and servers installed. To create the OU and permissions required for Group Writeback you need to do the following.

Import the cmdlets needed to configure your Active Directory for writeback by running Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session. You need Domain Admin permissions for the domain in the local AD forest that you will write back groups to. The cmdlets for this are obtained by running the Azure AD Connect tool.

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$cloudGroupOU = "OU=CloudGroups,DC=contoso,DC=com"
Initialize-ADSyncGroupWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -GroupWriteBackContainerDN $cloudGroupOU

Once these cmdlets are run the AADSync account will have permissions to write objects to this OU. You can view the permissions in Active Directory Users and Computers for this OU if you enable Advanced mode in that program. There should be a permission entry for this account that is not inherited from the parent OU’s.

At the time of writing, the distribution list that is created on writeback from Azure AD will not appear in the Global Address List in Outlook etc. or allow on-premises mailboxes to send to these internal only cloud based groups. To add it to the address book you need to create a new subdomain, update public DNS and add send connectors to hybrid Exchange Server. This is all outlined in https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt668829(v=exchg.150).aspx. This ensure’s that on-premises mailboxes can deliver to groups as internal senders and not require external senders enabled on the group. To add the group to the Global Address List you need to run Update-AddressList in Exchange Server. Once group writeback is prepared for using these cmdlets here and AADConnect has had it enabled during the Synchronization Options page, you should see the groups appearing in the selected OU as shown:

image

And you should find that on-premises users can send email to these groups as well.

Preparing for Password Writeback

The option for users to change their passwords in the cloud and have then written back to on-premises (with multifactor authentication and proof of right to change the password) is also available in Office 365 / Azure AD with the Premium Azure Active Directory or Enterprise Mobility Pack licence.

To enable password writeback for AADConnect you need to enable the Password Writeback option in AADConnect synchronization settings and then run the following three PowerShell cmdlets on the AADSync server:


Get-ADSyncConnector | fl name,AADPasswordResetConfiguration
Get-ADSyncAADPasswordResetConfiguration -Connector "contoso.onmicrosoft.com - AAD"
Set-ADSyncAADPasswordResetConfiguration -Connector "contoso.onmicrosoft.com - AAD" -Enable $true

The first of these cmdlets lists the ADSync connectors and the name and password reset state of the connector. You need the name of the AAD connector. The middle cmdlet tells you the state of password writeback on that connector and the last cmdlet enables it if needed. The name of the connector is required in these last two cmdlets.

To set the permissions on-premises for the passwords to be written back the following script is needed:

$passwordOU = "DC=contoso,DC=com" #[you can scope this down to a specific OU]
$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Reset Password`";user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Change Password`";user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;lockoutTime;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;pwdLastSet;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Finally you need to run the above once per domain.

Preparing for Exchange Server Hybrid Writeback

Hybrid mode in Exchange Server requires the writing back on eight attributes from Azure AD to Active Directory. The list of attributes written back is found here. The following script will set these permissions for you in the OU you select (or as shown at the root of the domain). The DirSync tool used to do all this permissioning for you, but the AADSync tool does not. Therefore scripts such as this are required. This script sets lots of permissions on these eight attributes, but for clarify on running the script the output of the script is sent to Null. Remove the “| Out-Null” from the script to see the changes as they occur (the script also takes a lot longer to run).

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$HybridOU = "DC=contoso,DC=com"

#Object type: user
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUCVoiceMailSettings;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUserHoldPolicies;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchArchiveStatus;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeSendersHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchBlockedSendersHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeRecipientsHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;publicDelegates;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchDelegateLinkList;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: iNetOrgPerson
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUCVoiceMailSettings;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUserHoldPolicies;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchArchiveStatus;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeSendersHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchBlockedSendersHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeRecipientsHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;publicDelegates;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchDelegateLinkList;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: group
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;group'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: contact
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;contact'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Finally you need to run the above once per domain.

Preparing for User Writeback

[This functionality is not in the current builds of AADConnect]

Currently in preview at the time of writing, you are able to make users in Azure Active Directory (cloud users as Office 365 would call them) and write them back to on-premises Active Directory. The users password is not written back and so needs changing before the user can login on-premises.

To prepare the on-premises Active Directory to writeback user objects you need to run this script. This is contained in AdSyncPrep.psm1 and that is installed as part of Azure AD Connect. Azure AD Connect will install Azure AD Sync, which is needed to do the writeback. To load the AdSyncPrep.psm1 module into PowerShell run Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session.

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is an account usually in the form of AAD_number].
$cloudUserOU = "OU=CloudUsers,DC=contoso,DC=com"
Initialize-ADSyncUserWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -UserWriteBackContainerDN $cloudUserOU

Once the next AADSync occurs you should see users in the OU used above that match the cloud users in Office 365 as shown:

image

Prepare for Windows 10 Registered Device Writeback Sync

Windows 10 devices that are joined to your domain can be written to Azure Active Directory as a registered device, and so conditional access rules on device ownership can be enforced. To do this you need to import the AdSyncPrep.psm1 module. This module supports the following two additional cmdlets to prepare your Active Directory for Windows 10 device sync:

CD "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep"
Import-Module .\AdSyncPrep.psm1
Initialize-ADSyncDomainJoinedComputerSync
Initialize-ADSyncNGCKeysWriteBack

These cmdlets are run as follows:

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$azureAdCreds = Get-Credential #[Azure Active Directory administrator account]

CD "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep"
Import-Module .\AdSyncPrep.psm1
Initialize-ADSyncDomainJoinedComputerSync -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -AzureADCredentials $azureAdCreds 
Initialize-ADSyncNGCKeysWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName 

To successfully run these cmdlets you need to have the latest version of the Microsoft Online PowerShell modules installed (the V1.1 versions, not the V2.0 preview). You can get these from https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/MSOnline (which in turn needs MSOL Signin Assistant from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41950 and the Windows Management Framework v5 from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=50395). If you get errors in the above, make sure you have the correct version, download from above and try the scripts again.

Once complete, open Active Directory Sites and Services and from the View menu Show Services Node. Then you should see the GUID of your domain under the Device Registration Configuration container.

image

Speaking at TechEd Europe 2014

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in certificates, cloud, EOP, exchange, exchange online, Exchange Online Protection, GeoDNS, hybrid, IAmMEC, journaling, mcm, mcsm, MVP, Office 365, smarthost, smtp, starttls, TechEd, TLS, transport

I’m please to announce that Microsoft have asked me to speak on “Everything You Need To Know About SMTP Transport for Office 365” at TechEd Europe 2014 in Barcelona. Its going to be a busy few weeks as I go from there to the MVP Summit in Redmond, WA straight from that event.

image

My session is going to see how you can ensure your migration to Office 365 will be successful with regards to keeping mail flow working and not seeing any non-deliverable messages. We will cover real world scenarios for hybrid and staged migrations so that we can consider the impact of mail flow at all stages of the project. We will look at testing mail flow, SMTP to multiple endpoints, solving firewalling issues, and how email addressing and distribution group delivery is done in Office 365 so that we always know where a user is and what is going to happen when they are migrated.

Compliance and hygiene issues will be covered with regards to potentially journaling from multiple places and the impact of having anti-spam filtering in Office 365 that might not be your mail flow entry point.

We will consider the best practices for changing SMTP endpoints and when is a good time to change over from on-premise first to cloud first delivery, and if you need to maintain on-premises delivery how should you go about that process.

And finally we will cover troubleshooting the process should it go wrong or how to see what is actually happening during your test phase when you are trying out different options to see which works for your company and your requirements.

Full details of the session, once it goes live, are at http://teeu2014.eventpoint.com/topic/details/OFC-B350 (Microsoft ID login needed to see this). Room and time to be announced.