Is Your SenderID/SPF or DKIM Record Correctly Configured

Posted on Posted in DNS, domain, exchange, exchange online, IAmMEC, MX, Office 365, spam

With Microsoft having just announced that DKIM is coming to Office 365 soon (release notes here) and SenderID is already available, I thought this is a good time to write a blog on the use of DMARC to show if your records are correct.

DMARC is a protocol that allows you to see the effect of your SenderID/SPF records from the viewpoint of the recipient – as long as the recipient is one of the larger email receivers in the world, but that should be enough to help you validate your SenderID/SPF records. DMARC is currently in use at Outlook.com/Hotmail, Gmail, Facebook, Yahoo and Twitter to name some of the larger users of it.

To receive the results of a DMARC report you need to add your DMARC policy as a new TXT record to DNS. It looks something like this:

_dmarc IN TXT “v=DMARC1;p=reject;pct=100;rua=mailto:postmaster@dmarcdomain.com”

This TXT record for “_dmarc” at the root of your domain tells the receiver to report back to you all (pct=100) SenderID/SPF failures. They also report DKIM failures as well. If you send lots of email you might want to report on a smaller number of overall failures, say pct=20! The record says who to send the report to (rua=email address).

Finally, and one of the most useful bits of DMARC is that you can tell the receiver what to do with failures in your SenderID/SFP or DKIM record. For example in SenderID/SPF you can set the modifier “-all” to the end. This says that anything not covered in the rest of the record is to fail SenderID. The recipient then decides what to do with your email (as it might be your email, as you might have got your SPF or DKIM record wrong). In the example above you tell the recipient email system you would like them to reject (p=) the email. The policy could be quarantine or none. The policy p=none means accept the message, but report it back to the rua email address in the DMARC record.

p=none allows you to introduce SPF/DKIM and ensure no rejection of your messages at the recipient end, but get reporting back on the IP addresses from which your emails (or spoofed emails) are coming from.

Once you are sure your SPF/DKIM records are correct change your policy to p=quarantine and then when you are finally sure, change it to p=reject.

An example of creating a DMARC policy on your domain is shown below. The below example is AWS Route 53 DNS, but any DNS management console that support TXT records should work:

image

Finally, as this is just a quick intro to DMARC, you can use the ruf= qualifier to set the email address of per message failure reports.

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