Updating Exchange 2013 Anti-Malware Agent From A Non-Internet Connected Server

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2013, 64 bit, antivirus, exchange, Exchange Online Protection, IAmMEC, malware, mcm, mcsm, powershell, x64

In Forefront Protection for Exchange (now discontinued) for Exchange 2010 it was possible to run the script at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2292741 to download the signatures and scan engines when the server did not have a direct connection to the download site at forefrontdl.microsoft.com.

To achieve the same with Exchange 2013 and the built-in anti-malware transport agent you can repurpose the 2010 script to download the engine updates to a folder on a machine with internet access and then use a script from Exchange Server 2013 to download from a share on the first machine that you downloaded the files to, and that the Exchange Servers can reach.

So start by downloading the script at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2292741 and saving it as Update-Engines.ps1.

Create a folder called C:\Engines (for example) and share it with Authenticated Users / Read access and full control to the account that will run Update-Engines.ps1

Run Update-Engines.ps1 with the following

Update-Engines.ps1 -EngineDirPath C:\engines -UpdatePathUrl http://forefrontdl.microsoft.com/server/scanengineUpdate/  -Engines “Microsoft” -Platforms amd64

The above cmdlet/script downloads just the 64 bit Microsoft engine as that is all you need and places them in the local folder (which is the shared folder you created) on that machine. You can schedule this script using standard published techniques for scheduling PowerShell.

On your Exchange Server that has no internet connectivity, start Exchange Management Shell and run the following:

Set-MalwareFilteringServer ServerName –PrimaryUpdatePath \\dlserver\enginesShare

Then start a PowerShell window that is running as an administrator – you can use Exchange Management Shell, but it too needs to be started as an administrator to do this last step. In this shell run the following:

Add-PSSnapin microsoft.forefront.filtering.management.powershell

Get-EngineUpdateInformation

Start-EngineUpdate

Get-EngineUpdateInformation

Then compare the first results from Get-EngineUpdateInformation with the second results. If you have waited 30 or so seconds, the second set of results should be updated to the current time for the LastChecked value. UpdateVersion and UpdateStatus might also have changed. If your Exchange Server has internet connectivity it will already have updated automatically every hour and so not need this script running.

Access Is Denied Message After Sysprep–How To Fix

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in 2003, 2007, 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 64 bit, backup, bios, hyper-v, password, recovery, sysprep, windows, windows 2003, windows 2008, windows 7, windows server, workstation, x64, x86

If before you use Sysprep to prepare a Windows machine for imaging you set the administrators password “User cannot change password” then sysprep will not clear this setting, but will set the “User must change password at next logon” setting. Normally these two settings are mutually exclusive, but in the scenario for sysprep it seems they can both end up being set.

This means you get prompted to reset you password at first logon after sysprep completes and then find you have “Access Denied” as the response. There is seemingly no way around this Catch-22.

That is unless you use the Offline NT Password and Registry Editor. This tool allows password resets when booting the server from a CD or USB key (so physical access to the server is required). As the download for this is an iso file, it can also be used in virtual environments by configuring your virtual machine to boot from the iso you have downloaded.

To allow you to logon to your machine following the above issue, all you need to in the Offline NT Password tool is to blank out the administrators password and unlock the account. These are options 1 and 4 during the password reset stage. Full instructions with screenshots follow:

  1. Boot the server with the issue with the Offline NT Password and Registry Editor iso file:
    image
  2. Choose the correct boot option (or just press Enter for the defaults):
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  3. For Vista and earlier select the default of Option 1. For Windows 7 and Windows 2008 and later select Option 2 (to boot into the second partition on the disk). You might need to select a different option if you have more partitions. You need to select the partition that Windows is installed on.
  4. If the disk is marked as Read-Only ensure that the server went through a clean boot and was not shutdown incorrectly. Once the messages indicate a writable partition
    image
  5. Select the presented folder (by pressing Enter again). You can typically just press Enter through most of these stages. You will be asked what you want to do – we want to reset passwords:
    image
  6. Select Option 1 to Edit user data and passwords:
    image
  7. Press Enter to choose the Administrator account:
    image
  8. Type 1 to Clear (blank) user password. You should get back the message “Password cleared!”:
    image
  9. Press Enter again to reselect the Administrator account, and this time select Option 4 to unlock the account (even though this program tells you the account is already unlocked):
    image
  10. Once you see “Unlocked!” you can quit from this program. The process to quit requires you to save your changes. Note that the default setting is not to save changes, so you cannot now use Enter to select the default option.
  11. Enter ! to quit from the password reset program:
    image
  12. Enter q to quit from the script and to ask about saving changes:
    image
  13. Enter y to write back the files that have been changed:
    image
  14. You should have been told “***** EDIT COMPLETE *****”. Press Enter to finish the program scripts:
    image
  15. At this final screen you can remove the CD or unmount the iso image from your virtual machine and press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart the server. The server should now boot into Windows and auto-logon as it has a blank password.
  16. Change the password and optionally untick the “User cannot change password” setting.

Exchange Log Truncation Failure in a DAG

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in 2010, backup, domain, exchange, networking, windows 2008, x64

Today I visited a client who had noticed that no log files had ever been removed after any backup within Exchange 2010 SP1. It was fortuitous that they had enough log disk space for about eight months of log generations. The disadvantage was that we were four months into this time period, so it was a ticking clock, and that the nightly incremental backups were taking longer and longer.

They were getting the following error in their backup datacentre:

image

Unable to communicate with the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service to coordinate log truncation for database ‘name’ due to an RPC communication failure. Error 3355379671 Extended Error: 0 and Event ID 2136 for the MSExchangeRepl service in the Application event log.

What the error does not clearly say is that the Microsoft Exchange Replication service (MSExchangeRepl) on the server in the DR site (a passive node in the DAG) needs to communicate via RPC to the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service on the server holding the active node of the database.

In the case of my client, the Exchange team is not the same people as the network team or indeed the firewall team, and these teams are in different countries. In the case of the network for this client, the Replication network for the DAG had been opened to allow RPC traffic, but the MAPI (Client) network had not.

When Exchange in the DR site needed to check which logs it could truncate (a process it performs every 15 minutes), it needs to talk to the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service on the server holding the active copy of the database, and name resolution was returning (as expected) the IP address of the server on the MAPI/Client network. This network blocked RPC between servers and so (as one of the many issues they now attribute to this problem) logs could not be truncated and Event ID 2136 was posted once per database on the passive node in the DR site. The two servers in the primary site could RPC each other, so this log is not repeated in the primary site.

To solve this log growth problem without waiting for a response from the firewall team, we added a record to the hosts file on the passive server to override DNS name resolution, and within 15 minutes 2TB of log files instantly disappeared on all servers. Name resolution was reverted to DNS and the firewall team contacted.

Windows 2008, IIS 7.0, 64 bit Server, Terminal Services Web Application and Access Databases

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2008, 64 bit, access, iis, oledb, proxy, sql express, windows, x64

This is a long list of pre-requisites, but for your information they do not work together.

  1. If you have a web site that uses Access as its data storage and you migrate that site to an x64 Windows machine then access to the Access MDB file ceases with the following error: “‘Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0’ provider is not registered on the local machine”.
  2. On IIS 6.0 you need to set the entire web server to 32 bit mode, but on Windows 2008/IIS 7.0 you can set each application pool to 32 or 64 bit. This is a property found under Advanced Settings for the application pool. To gain access to Access MDB files the application pool needs to run in 32 bit mode.
  3. If you have TSWeb installed, then you also have installed the RPC/HTTP proxy component.
  4. If you have the RPC/HTTP proxy component installed any 32 bit application pool will fail upon starting – Error 5139 for Microsoft-Windows-WAS.

So to use Access databases in a legacy web application migrated to Windows 2008, 64 bit, with TSWeb also installed either uninstall TSWeb (and RPC/HTTP proxy), or use a different server, or rewrite the web application to use SQL Express. Supposedly this will be fixed in the first service pack for Windows 2008.

There – it only took 6 hours to work that one out!