Checking for Login Issues with AD FS and Office 365

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2012 R2, ADFS 3.0

This post will look at how you can view login errors in AD FS, trace them back to the Event Viewer on your AD FS server(s) and then help the user login correctly.

Unlike earlier versions of ADFS it is not required to enabled config files and registry keys to turn on additional logging. All login failures (not successes) are reported to the AD FS log in the Event Viewer on the AD FS Server. If you have more than one server either always check all servers or setup log file synchronization to another server.

To view the AD FS log file in Event Viewer navigate to Applications and Services Logs > AD FS > Admin – errors on that box are shown here. If you have a correlation Activity ID (see below) you can find that here and track errors back to the entry in the logs.

Applications and Services Logs Further errors (problems with system, more detailed debugging errors) can also be recorded. Click Applications and Services Logs in Event Viewer then right-click and choose View > Show Analytic and Debug Logs. Note to see View you need to click on Applications and Services Logs and not just right-click it.

clip_image002

Once Analytic and Debug Logs are visible you can find the AD FS Debug log. This is under Applications and Services Logs > AD FS Tracing > Debug.

You need to right-click this log file and choose Enable Log. Then get the user to repeat the issue. It will be logged in great detail here. Once user finished, disable logging and save file. You can search the file once it is saved. It is possible to search the file during log collection, but you can only search one page of data at a time and the pages are both small and generated quite quickly – so save the log file before searching it.

An example of some of the data that can be read in the debug log is shown below. This log has the Activity ID shown as well, and this can be correlated back to the error message that you might see in AD FS during login if ADFS is not working.

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Configuring Writeback Permissions in Active Directory for Azure Active Directory Sync

Posted on 45 CommentsPosted in 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, active directory, ADFS 3.0, Azure, Azure Active Directory, cloud, exchange, exchange online, groups, hybrid, IAmMEC, Office 365, WAP, Web Application Proxy, windows

[This blog post was last updated 5th October 2017 – added support to Exchange Hybrid for msExchDelegateLinkList attribute which was announced at Microsoft Ignite 2017 for the support of keeping auto-mapping working cross on-premises and the cloud]

[Updated 18th June 2017 in advance of the release of AADConnect version 1.1.553.0. This post contains updates to the below scripts to include the latest attributes synced back to on-premises including publicDelegates, which is used for supporting bi-directional sync for “Send on Behalf” of permissions in Exchange Online/Exchange Server hybrid writeback scenarios]

[Update March 2017 – added another blog post on using the below to fix permission-issue errors on admin and other protected accounts at http://c7solutions.com/2017/03/administrators-aadconnect-and-adminsdholder-issues]

Azure Active Directory has been long the read-only cousin of Active Directory for those Office 365 and Azure users who sync their directory from Active Directory to Azure Active Directory apart from eight attributes for Exchange Server hybrid mode. Not any more. Azure Active Directory writeback is now available and in preview for some of the writeback types at the time of writing. This enabled objects to be mastered or changed in Azure Active Directory and written back to on-premises Active Directory.

This writeback includes:

  • Devices that can be enrolled with Office 365 MDM or Intune, which will allow login to AD FS controlled resources based on user and the device they are on
  • “Modern Groups” in Office 365 can be written back to on-premises Exchange Server 2013 CU8 or later hybrid mode and appear as mail enabled distribution lists on premises. Does not require AAD Premium licences
  • Users can change their passwords via the login page or user settings in Office 365 and have that password written back online.
  • Exchange Server hybrid writeback is the classic writeback from Azure AD and is the apart from Group Writeback is the only one of these writebacks that does not require Azure AD Premium licences.
  • User writeback from Azure AD (i.e. users made in Office 365 in the cloud for example) to on-premises Active Directory
  • Windows 10 devices for “Azure AD Domain Join” functionality

All of these features (apart from Exchange Hybrid writeback) require AADConnect and not and of the earlier verions (which will be actively blocked by the end of 2017 anyway). Install and run the AADConnect program to migrate from DirSync to AADSync and then in the Synchronization Options on rerunning the AADConnect wizard you can add all these writeback functions.

In all the below sections you need to grant permission to the connector account. You can find the connector account for your Active Directory forest from the Synchronization Service program > Connectors > double-click your domain > select Connect to Active Directory Forest. The account listed here is the connector account you need to grant permissions to.

SourceAnchor Writeback

For users with (typically) multi-forest deployments or plans or a forest migration, the objectGuid value in Active Directory, which is used as the source for the attribute that keys your on-premises object to your synced cloud object – in AAD sync parlance, this is known as the SourceAnchor. If you set up AADConnect version 1.1.553.0 or later you can opt to change from objectGuid to a new source anchor attribute known as ms-ds-consistencyGuid. To be able to use this new feature you need the ability for AADConnect connector account to be able to read ObjectGUID and then write it back to ms-ds-consistencyGuid. The read permissions are typically available to the connector account without doing anything special, and if AADConnect is installed in Express Mode it will get the write permissions it needs, but as with the rest of this blog, if you are not using Express Mode you need to grant the permissions manually and so write permissions are needed to the ms-ds-consistencyGuid attribute. This can be done with this script.


$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$ForestDN = "DC=contoso,DC=com"

$cmd = "dsacls '$ForestDN' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;ms-ds-consistencyGuid;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Note that if you use ms-ds-consistencyGuid then there are changes required on your ADFS deployment as well. The Issuance Transform Rules for the Office 365 Relying Party Trust contains a rule that specifies the ImmutableID (aka AADConnect SourceAnchor) that the user will be identified as for login. By default this is set to ObjectGUID, and if you use AADConnect to set up ADFS for you then the application will update the rule. But if you set up ADFS yourself then you need to update the rule.

Issuance Transform Rules

When Office 365 is configured to federate a domain (use ADFS for authentication of that domain and not Azure AD) then the following are the claims rules that exist out of the box need to be adjusted. This is to support the use of ms-ds-consistencyguid as the immutable ID.

ADFS Management UI > Trust Relationships > Relying Party Trusts

Select Microsoft Office 365 Identity Platform > click Edit Claim Rules

You get two or three rules listed here. You get three rules if you use -SupportMultipleDomain switch in Convert-MSOLDomainToFederated.
Rule 1:
Change objectGUID to ms-DS-ConsistencyGUID
Rule Was:
c:[Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname”]
=> issue(store = “Active Directory”, types = (“http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/claims/UPN”, “http://schemas.microsoft.com/LiveID/Federation/2008/05/ImmutableID”), query = “samAccountName={0};userPrincipalName,objectGUID;{1}”, param = regexreplace(c.Value, “(?<domain>[^\\]+)\\(?<user>.+)”, “${user}”), param = c.Value);
New Value:
c:[Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname”]
=> issue(store = “Active Directory”, types = (“http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/claims/UPN”, “http://schemas.microsoft.com/LiveID/Federation/2008/05/ImmutableID”), query = “samAccountName={0};userPrincipalName,ms-DS-ConsistencyGUID;{1}”, param = regexreplace(c.Value, “(?<domain>[^\\]+)\\(?<user>.+)”, “${user}”), param = c.Value);

Preparing for Device Writeback

If you do not have a 2012 R2 or later domain controller then you need to update the schema of your forest. Do this by getting a Windows Server 2012 R2 ISO image and mounting it as a drive. Copy the support/adprep folder from this image or DVD to a 64 bit domain member in the same site as the Schema Master. Then run adprep /forestprep from an admin cmd prompt when logged in as a Schema Admin. The domain member needs to be a 64 bit domain joined machine for adprep.exe to run.

Wait for the schema changes to replicate around the network.

Import the cmdlets needed to configure your Active Directory for writeback by running Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session. You need Azure AD Global Admin and Enterprise Admin permissions for Azure and local AD forest respectively. The cmdlets for this are obtained by running the Azure AD Connect tool.


$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
Initialize-ADSyncDeviceWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -DomainName contoso.com #[domain where devices will be created].

This will create the “Device Registration Services” node in the Configuration partition of your forest as shown:

image

To see this, open Active Directory Sites and Services and from the View menu select Show Services Node. Also in the domain partition you should now see an OU called RegisteredDevices. The AADSync account now has permissions to write objects to this container as well.

In Azure AD Connect, if you get the error “This feature is disabled because there is no eligible forest with appropriate permissions for device writeback” then you need to complete the steps in this section and click Previous in the AADConnect wizard to go back to the “Connect your directories” page and then you can click Next to return to the “Optional features” page. This time the Device Writeback option will not be greyed out.

Device Writeback needs a 2012 R2 or later AD FS server and WAP to make use of the device info in the Active Directory (for example, conditional access to resources based on the user and the device they are using). Once Device Writeback is prepared for with these cmdlets and the AADConnect Synchronization Options page is enabled for Device Writeback then the following will appear in Active Directory:

image

Not shown in the above, but adding the Display Name column in Active Directory Users and Computers tells you the device name. The registered owner and registered users of the device are available to view, but as they are SID values, they are not really readable.

If you have multiple forests, then you need add the SCP record for the tenant name in each separate forest. The above will do it for the forest AADConnect is installed in and the below script can be used to add the SCP to other forests:

$verifiedDomain = "contoso.com"  # Replace this with any of your verified domain names in Azure AD
$tenantID = "27f998bf-86f2-41bf-91ab-2d7ab011df35"  # Replace this with you tenant ID
$configNC = "CN=Configuration,DC=corp,DC=contoso,DC=com"  # Replace this with your AD configuration naming context
$de = New-Object System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry
$de.Path = "LDAP://CN=Services," + $configNC
$deDRC = $de.Children.Add("CN=Device Registration Configuration", "container")
$deDRC.CommitChanges()
$deSCP = $deDRC.Children.Add("CN=62a0ff2e-97b9-4513-943f-0d221bd30080", "serviceConnectionPoint")
$deSCP.Properties["keywords"].Add("azureADName:" + $verifiedDomain)
$deSCP.Properties["keywords"].Add("azureADId:" + $tenantID)
$deSCP.CommitChanges()

Preparing for Group Writeback

Writing Office 365 “Modern Groups” back to Active Directory on-premises requires Exchange Server 2013 CU8 or later schema updates and servers installed. To create the OU and permissions required for Group Writeback you need to do the following.

Import the cmdlets needed to configure your Active Directory for writeback by running Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session. You need Domain Admin permissions for the domain in the local AD forest that you will write back groups to. The cmdlets for this are obtained by running the Azure AD Connect tool.

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$cloudGroupOU = "OU=CloudGroups,DC=contoso,DC=com"
Initialize-ADSyncGroupWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -GroupWriteBackContainerDN $cloudGroupOU

Once these cmdlets are run the AADSync account will have permissions to write objects to this OU. You can view the permissions in Active Directory Users and Computers for this OU if you enable Advanced mode in that program. There should be a permission entry for this account that is not inherited from the parent OU’s.

At the time of writing, the distribution list that is created on writeback from Azure AD will not appear in the Global Address List in Outlook etc. or allow on-premises mailboxes to send to these internal only cloud based groups. To add it to the address book you need to create a new subdomain, update public DNS and add send connectors to hybrid Exchange Server. This is all outlined in https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt668829(v=exchg.150).aspx. This ensure’s that on-premises mailboxes can deliver to groups as internal senders and not require external senders enabled on the group. To add the group to the Global Address List you need to run Update-AddressList in Exchange Server. Once group writeback is prepared for using these cmdlets here and AADConnect has had it enabled during the Synchronization Options page, you should see the groups appearing in the selected OU as shown:

image

And you should find that on-premises users can send email to these groups as well.

Preparing for Password Writeback

The option for users to change their passwords in the cloud and have then written back to on-premises (with multifactor authentication and proof of right to change the password) is also available in Office 365 / Azure AD with the Premium Azure Active Directory or Enterprise Mobility Pack licence.

To enable password writeback for AADConnect you need to enable the Password Writeback option in AADConnect synchronization settings and then run the following three PowerShell cmdlets on the AADSync server:


Get-ADSyncConnector | fl name,AADPasswordResetConfiguration
Get-ADSyncAADPasswordResetConfiguration -Connector "contoso.onmicrosoft.com - AAD"
Set-ADSyncAADPasswordResetConfiguration -Connector "contoso.onmicrosoft.com - AAD" -Enable $true

The first of these cmdlets lists the ADSync connectors and the name and password reset state of the connector. You need the name of the AAD connector. The middle cmdlet tells you the state of password writeback on that connector and the last cmdlet enables it if needed. The name of the connector is required in these last two cmdlets.

To set the permissions on-premises for the passwords to be written back the following script is needed:

$passwordOU = "DC=contoso,DC=com" #[you can scope this down to a specific OU]
$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Reset Password`";user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":CA;`"Change Password`";user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;lockoutTime;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

$cmd = "dsacls.exe '$passwordOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;pwdLastSet;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Finally you need to run the above once per domain.

Preparing for Exchange Server Hybrid Writeback

Hybrid mode in Exchange Server requires the writing back on eight attributes from Azure AD to Active Directory. The list of attributes written back is found here. The following script will set these permissions for you in the OU you select (or as shown at the root of the domain). The DirSync tool used to do all this permissioning for you, but the AADSync tool does not. Therefore scripts such as this are required. This script sets lots of permissions on these eight attributes, but for clarify on running the script the output of the script is sent to Null. Remove the “| Out-Null” from the script to see the changes as they occur (the script also takes a lot longer to run).

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$HybridOU = "DC=contoso,DC=com"

#Object type: user
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUCVoiceMailSettings;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUserHoldPolicies;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchArchiveStatus;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeSendersHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchBlockedSendersHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeRecipientsHash;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;publicDelegates;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchDelegateLinkList;user'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: iNetOrgPerson
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUCVoiceMailSettings;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchUserHoldPolicies;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchArchiveStatus;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeSendersHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchBlockedSendersHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchSafeRecipientsHash;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msDS-ExternalDirectoryObjectID;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;publicDelegates;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;msExchDelegateLinkList;iNetOrgPerson'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: group
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;group'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

#Object type: contact
$cmd = "dsacls '$HybridOU' /I:S /G '`"$accountName`":WP;proxyAddresses;contact'"
Invoke-Expression $cmd | Out-Null

Finally you need to run the above once per domain.

Preparing for User Writeback

[This functionality is not in the current builds of AADConnect]

Currently in preview at the time of writing, you are able to make users in Azure Active Directory (cloud users as Office 365 would call them) and write them back to on-premises Active Directory. The users password is not written back and so needs changing before the user can login on-premises.

To prepare the on-premises Active Directory to writeback user objects you need to run this script. This is contained in AdSyncPrep.psm1 and that is installed as part of Azure AD Connect. Azure AD Connect will install Azure AD Sync, which is needed to do the writeback. To load the AdSyncPrep.psm1 module into PowerShell run Import-Module ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep\AdSyncPrep.psm1’ from an administrative PowerShell session.

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is an account usually in the form of AAD_number].
$cloudUserOU = "OU=CloudUsers,DC=contoso,DC=com"
Initialize-ADSyncUserWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -UserWriteBackContainerDN $cloudUserOU

Once the next AADSync occurs you should see users in the OU used above that match the cloud users in Office 365 as shown:

image

Prepare for Windows 10 Registered Device Writeback Sync

Windows 10 devices that are joined to your domain can be written to Azure Active Directory as a registered device, and so conditional access rules on device ownership can be enforced. To do this you need to import the AdSyncPrep.psm1 module. This module supports the following two additional cmdlets to prepare your Active Directory for Windows 10 device sync:

CD "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep"
Import-Module .\AdSyncPrep.psm1
Initialize-ADSyncDomainJoinedComputerSync
Initialize-ADSyncNGCKeysWriteBack

These cmdlets are run as follows:

$accountName = "domain\aad_account" #[this is the account that will be used by Azure AD Connect Sync to manage objects in the directory, this is often an account in the form of MSOL_number or AAD_number].
$azureAdCreds = Get-Credential #[Azure Active Directory administrator account]

CD "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect\AdPrep"
Import-Module .\AdSyncPrep.psm1
Initialize-ADSyncDomainJoinedComputerSync -AdConnectorAccount $accountName -AzureADCredentials $azureAdCreds 
Initialize-ADSyncNGCKeysWriteBack -AdConnectorAccount $accountName 

Once complete, open Active Directory Sites and Services and from the View menu Show Services Node. Then you should see the GUID of your domain under the Device Registration Configuration container.

image

SSL and Exchange Server

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in 2008 R2, 2012 R2, 2013, certificates, exchange, https, IAmMEC, JetNexus, load balancer, Load Master, loadbalancer, mobile phones, SSL, TLS, windows server, xp

In October 2014 or thereabouts it became known that the SSL protocol (specifically SSL v3) was broken and decryption of the encrypted data was possible. This blog post sets out the steps to protect your Exchange Server organization regardless of whether you have one server or many, or whether or not you use a load balancer or not. As load balancers can terminate the SSL session and recreate it, it might be that changes are needed on your load balancer or maybe directly on the servers that run the CAS role. This blog post will cover both options and looks at the settings for a Kemp load balancer and a JetNexus load balancer.

Of course being an Exchange Server MVP, I tend to blog about Exchange related stuff, but actually this is valid for any server that you publish to the internet and probably valid of any internal server that you encrypt traffic to via the SSL suite of protocols. Microsoft outline the below configuration at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/security/3009008.aspx.

The steps in this blog will look at turning off the SSL protocol in Windows Server and turning on the TLS protocol (which does the same thing as SSL and is interchangeable for SSL, but more secure at the time of writing – Jan 2015). Some clients do not support TLS (such as Internet Explorer on Windows XP Service Pack 2 or earlier, so securing your servers as you need to do may stop some home users connecting to your Exchange Servers, but as XP SP2 should not be in use in any business now, these changes should not affect desktops. You could always use a different browser on XP as that might mitigate this issue, but using XP is a security risk in an of itself anyway! To disable clients from connecting to SSL v3 sites requires a client or GPO setting and this can be found via your favourite search engine.

Note that the registry settings and updates for the load balancers in this blog post will restrict client access to your servers if your client cannot negotiate a mutual cipher and secure channel protocol. Therefore care and testing are strongly advised.

Testing and checking your changes

Before you make any changes to your servers, especially internet facing ones, check and document what you have in place at the moment using https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest. This service will connect to an SSL/TLS protected web site and report back on the issues found. Before running any of the changes below see what overall rating you get and document the following:

  • Authentication section: record the signature algorithm. For the signature algorithm its possible the certificate authority signature will be marked “SHA1withRSA WEAK SIGNATURE”. This certificate, if rekeyed and issued again by your certificate authority might be replaced with a SHA-2 certificate. The Google Chrome browser from September 2014 will report sites secured with this SHA-1 certificate as not fully trustworthy based on the expiry date of the certificate. If your certificate expires after Jan 1st 2017 then get it rekeyed as soon as possible. As 2015 goes on, this date will move closer in time. From early 2015 this cut off date becomes June 1st 2016 and so on. Details on the dates for this impact are in http://googleonlinesecurity.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/gradually-sunsetting-sha-1.html. You can also use https://shaaaaaaaaaaaaa.com/ to test your certificate if the site is public facing, and this website gives details on who is now issuing SHA-2 keyed certificates. You can examine your external servers for SHA-1 certificates and the impact in Chrome (and later IE and Firefox) at https://www.digicert.com/sha1-sunset/. To do the same internally, use the DigiCert Certificate Inspector at https://www.digicert.com/cert-inspector.htm.
  • Authentication section: record the path values. Ensure that each certificate is either in the trust store or sent by the server and not an extra download.
  • Configuration section: document the cipher suites that are provided by your server
  • Handshake simulation section: Here it will list browsers and other devices (mobile phones) and what their default cipher is. If you do not support the cipher they support then you cannot communicate. Note that you typically support more than one cipher and the client will often support more than one cipher to, so though it is shown here as a mismatch this does not mean that it will not work and if this client is used by your users then click the link for the client and ensure that the server offers at least one of the the ciphers required by the client – unless all the ciphers are insecure in which case do not use that client!

Once you have a document on your current configuration, and a list of the clients you need to support and the ciphers they need you to support, you can go about removing SSL v3 and insecure ciphers.

Disabling SSL v3 on the server

To disable SSL v3 on a Windows Server (2008 or later) you need to set the Enabled registry value at “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 3.0\Server” to 0. If this value does not exist, the create a DWORD value called “Enabled” and leave it at 0. You then need to reboot the server.

If you are using Windows 2008 R2 or earlier you should enable TLS v1.1 and v1.2 at the same time. Those versions of Windows Server support TLS v1.1 and v1.2 but it is not enabled (only TLS v1.0 is enabled). To enable TLS v1.1 and v1.2 use set the Enabled value at “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.1\Server” to 1. Change the path to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.2\Server” and the same setting to support TLS v1.2. If these keys do not exist, create them. It is also documented that the “DisabledByDefault” key is required, but I have seen this noted as being the same as the “Enabled” key – just the opposite value. Therefore as I have not actually checked, I set both Enabled to 1 and DisabledByDefault to 0.

To do both the disabling of SSL v2 and v3 (v2 can be enabled on older versions of Windows and should be disabled as well) I place the following in a .reg file and double click it on each server, followed by a reboot for it to take effect. This .reg file contents also disables the RC4 ciphers. These ciphers have been considered insecure for a few years and when I configure my servers not to support SSL v3 I also disable the RC4 ciphers as well.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 2.0]

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Client]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Server]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 3.0]

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 3.0\Client]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\SSL 3.0\Server]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Ciphers\RC4 128/128]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Ciphers\RC4 40/128]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Ciphers\RC4 56/128]

"Enabled"=dword:00000000

Then I use the following .reg file to enabled TLS v1.1 and TLS v1.2

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.1]

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.1\Client]

"Enabled"=dword:00000001

"DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.1\Server]

"Enabled"=dword:00000001

"DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.2]

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.2\Client]

"Enabled"=dword:00000001

"DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000

 

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Protocols\TLS 1.2\Server]

"Enabled"=dword:00000001

"DisabledByDefault"=dword:00000000

 

Once you have applied both of the above sets of registry keys you can reboot the server at your convenience. Note that the regkeys may set values that are already set, for example TLS v1.1 and v1.2 are enabled on Exchange 2013 CAS servers and SSL v2 is disabled. For example the first of the below graphics comes from a test environment of mine that is running Windows Server 2012 R2 without any of the above registry keys set on them. You can see that Windows Server 2012 R2 is vulnerable to the POODLE attack and supports the RC4 cipher which is weak.

image

The F grade comes from patched but un-configured with regards to SSL Windows Server 2008 R2 server

image

After setting the above registry keys and rebooting, the test at https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest then showed the following for 2012 R2 on the left (A grade) and Windows Server 2008 R2 on the right (A- grade):

image image

Disabling SSL v3 on a Kemp LoadMaster load balancer

If you protect your servers with a load balancer, which is common in the Exchange Server world, then you need to set your SSL and cipher settings on the load balancer, unless you are only balancing at TCP layer 4 and doing SSL pass through. Therefore even for clients that have a load balancer, you might not need to make the changes on the load balancer, but on the server via the above section instead. If you do SSL termination on the load balancer (TCP layer 7 load balancing) then I recommend setting the registry keys on the Exchange servers anyway to avoid security issues if you need to connect to the server directly and if you are going to disable SSL v3 in one location (the load balancer) there is no problem in disabling it on the server as well.

For a Kemp load balancer you need to be running version 7.1-20b to be able to do the following, and to ensure that the SSL code on the load balancer is not susceptible to issues such as heartbleed as well. To configure your load balancer to disable SSL v3 you need to modify the SSL properties of the virtual server and check the “Support TLS Only” option.

To disable the RC4 weak ciphers then there are a few choices, but the easiest I have seen to do is to select “Perfect Forward Secrecy Only” under Selection Filters and then add all the listed filters. Then from this list remove the three RC4 ciphers that are in the list.

If you do not select “Support TLS Only” and leave the ciphers at the default level then your load balancer will get an C grade at the test at https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest because it is vulnerable to the POODLE attack. Setting just the “Support TLS Only” option and leaving the default ciphers in place will result in a B grade, as RC4 is still supported. Removing the RC4 ciphers (by following the instructions above to add the perfect forward secrecy ciphers and remove the RC4 ciphers from this list) as well as allowing only the TLS protocol will result in an A grade.

image

Kemp 7.1-22b does not support SSL v3 for the API and web interface as well as completing the above to protect the virtual services that the load balancer offers.

Kemp Technologies document the above steps at https://support.kemptechnologies.com/hc/en-us/articles/201995869, and point out the unobvious setting that if you filter the cipher list with the “TLS 1.x Ciphers Only” setting then it will only show you the TLS 1.2 ciphers and not any TLS 1.1 or TLS 1.0 ciphers. THerefore selecting “TLS 1.x Ciphers Only” rather than filtering using “Perfect Forward Secrecy Only” will result in a reduced client list, which may be an issue.

I was able to achieve an A grade on the SSL Labs test site. My certificate uses SHA-1, but expires in 2015 so by the time SHA-1 is reported an issue in the browser I will have changed it anyway.

image

Disabling SSL v3 on a JetNexus ALB-X load balancer

If you protect your servers with a load balancer, which is common in the Exchange Server world, then you need to set your SSL and cipher settings on the load balancer, unless you are only balancing at TCP layer 4 and doing SSL pass through. Therefore even for clients that have a load balancer, you might not need to make the changes on the load balancer, but on the server via the above section instead. If you do SSL termination on the load balancer (TCP layer 7 load balancing) then I recommend setting the registry keys on the Exchange servers anyway to avoid security issues if you need to connect to the server directly and if you are going to disable SSL v3 in one location (the load balancer) there is no problem in disabling it on the server as well.

For a JetNexus ALB-X load balancer you need to be running build 1553 or later. Build 1553 is a version 3 build, so any version 4 build is of a higher, and therefore valid build. This build (version 3.54.3) or later is needed to ensure Heartbleed mitigation and to allow the following configuration changes to be applied.

To configure the JetNexus  you need to upload a config file to turn off SSL v3 and RC4 ciphers. The config file is .txt file that is uploaded to the load balancer. In version 4, the primary cluster node can have the file uploaded to it, and the changes are replicated to the second node in the cluster automatically.

Before you upload a config file to make the changes required, ensure that you backup the current configuration from Advanced >> Update Software and click the button next to Download Current Configuration to save the configuration locally. Ensure you backup all nodes in a v4 cluster is appropriate.

Then select one of the three config file settings below and copy it to a text file and upload it from Advanced >> Update Software and use the Upload New Configuration option to install the file. The upload will reset all connections, do do this at during a quiet period of time.

The three configs are to reset the default ciphers, to disable SSL v3 and RC4, and to disable TLS v1.0 and SSL v3 and RC4

JetNexus protocol and cipher defaults:

#!update

 

[jetnexusdaemon]

Cipher004="ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:AES128-GCM-SHA256:RC4:HIGH:!MD5:!aNULL:!EDH"

Cipher1=""

Cipher2=""

CipherOptions="CIPHER_SERVER_PREFERENCE"

JetNexus protocol and cipher changes to disable SSL v3 and disable RC4 ciphers:

#!update

 

[jetnexusdaemon]

Cipher004="ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:AES128-GCM-SHA256:HIGH:!MD5:!aNULL:!EDH:!RC4"

Cipher1=""

Cipher2=""

CipherOptions="NO_SSLv3,CIPHER_SERVER_PREFERENCE"

JetNexus protocol and cipher changes to disable TLS v1.0, SSL v3 and disable RC4 ciphers:

#!update

 

[jetnexusdaemon]

Cipher004="ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:AES128-GCM-SHA256:HIGH:!MD5:!aNULL:!EDH:!RC4"

Cipher1=""

Cipher2=""

CipherOptions="NO_SSLv3,NO_TLSv1,CIPHER_SERVER_PREFERENCE"

On my test environment I was able to achieve an A- grade with the SSL Test website and the config to disable TLS 1.0, SSL3 and RC4 enabled. The A- is because of a lack of support for Forward Secrecy with the reference browsers used by the test site.

image

Browsers and Other Clients

There too much to discuss with regards to clients, apart from they need to support the same ciphers as mentioned above. A good guide to clients can be found at https://www.howsmyssl.com/s/about.html and from there you can test your client as well.

Additional comment 23/1/15 : One important comment to make though comes courtesy of Ingo Gegenwarth at https://ingogegenwarth.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/hardening-ssltls-and-outlook-for-mac/. This post discusses the TLS Renegotiation Indication Extension update at RFC 5746. It is possible to use the AllowInsecureRenegoClients registry key at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL to ensure that only clients with the update mentioned at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/980436 are allowed to connect. If this is enabled (set to Strict Mode) and the above to disable SSL 2 and 3 is done then Outlook for Mac clients cannot connect to your Exchange Server. If this regkey is deleted or has a non-zero value then connections to SSL 2 and 3 can be made, but only for a renegotiation to TLS. Therefore ensure that you allow Compatibility Mode (which is the default) when you disable SSL 2 and 3, as Outlook for Mac and Outlook for Mac for Office 365 both require SSL support to then be able to start a TLS session.

Creating Mailboxes in Office 365 When Using DirSync

Posted on 16 CommentsPosted in 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2013, Azure, cloud, dirsync, exchange, exchange online, Office 365

This blog post describes the process to create a new user in Active Directory on-premises when email is held in Office 365 and DirSync is in use. With DirSync in use the editable copy of the user object is on-premises and most attributes cannot be modified in the cloud.

Creating the User

  1. Open Active Directory Users and Computers on a Windows 2008 R2 or later server. Ensure that Advanced Features is enabled (View > Advanced Features)
    • Note that if you do not have 2008 R2 or later then use ADSI Edit to make the changes mentioned below that are made on the Attribute Editor tab in Active Directory Users and Computers 2008 R2 or later.
  2. Create an Active Directory user as you normally would. Do not complete any Exchange server properties if you are requested to do so. Completing Exchange on-premises will make a mailbox on premises that will then need to be migrated to Exchange Online. This document describes creating the mailbox online.
  3. Ensure that the user’s email address on the General tab of the AD properties is correct.
  4. Ensure that the users login name on the Account tab is as follows:
    1. User Logon Name: The first part of their email address
    2. The Domain name drop-down: The second part of their email address (not the AD domain name if they are different)
    3. User Logon Name (Pre Windows 2000): DOMAIN as provided and use the first part of the email address (i.e. first.last etc). If first part of email is too long enter as much as you can and ensure it is unique within domain)

Setting the Email Address Properties

  1. On the Attribute Editor tab ensure that Filter > Show only attributes that have values is not selected. Then find and enter the following information:
    1. proxyAddresses: SMTP:primary.email@domain for this user – SMTP needs to be in capitals. Then add additional email addresses as required, but these start with smtp: in lower case.
    2. targetAddress: SMTP:first_part_of_email@tennantname.onmicrosoft.com
    3. Note that both these addresses need to be unique within your directory – Attribute Editor will not check them for uniqueness but they will fail to replicate to Azure with DirSync if they are not unique.
  2. Click OK and close the account creation dialog.
  3. Within three hours this object will sync to Windows Azure Active Directory.
    1. This can be speeded up by logging into the DirSync server and starting PowerShell
    2. Type “Import-Module DirSync” in PowerShell
    3. Type “Start-OnlineCoexistenceSync” in PowerShell – DirSync will replicate now rather than waiting up to three hours.
  4. Check that the DirSync process was successful – if you have entered values that are not unique then DirSync will fail to replicate them and you will need to fix them on-premises and replicate them again.
  5. Licence the user in Office 365 by logging into https://portal.office.com and granting a licence to this user that contains an Exchange Online licence. The mailbox will be created automatically shortly after this.

Additional Attributes

The following are a list of attributes to change in ADSI Edit or the Attribute Editor tab to modify other attributes as required:

  • msExchHideFromAddressLists – Set to TRUE to hide from address lists
  • msExchRecipientDisplayType – Set to 6 for a remote mail user, 7 for room mailbox and 8 for an equipment mailbox, and 0 for a mailbox. A full list of these is at http://blogs.technet.com/b/johnbai/archive/2013/09/11/o365-msexchangerecipienttypedetails.aspx

Intermittent Error 8004789A with AD FS and WAP 3.0 (Windows Server 2012 R2)

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2012 R2, 2013, ADFS, ADFS 3.0, Office 365

This error appears when you attempt to authenticate with Office 365 using AD FS 3.0 – but only sometimes, and often it was working fine and then it starts!

I’ve found this error is due to two things, though there are other reasons. The full list of issues is at http://blogs.technet.com/b/applicationproxyblog/archive/2014/05/28/understanding-and-fixing-proxy-trust-ctl-issues-with-ad-fs-2012-r2-and-web-application-proxy.aspx.

I found that this occured if the WAP servers and the ADFS servers where at different timezones (not just times)

And I found that if the domain schema level is no 2012 R2 then you need to run the script included to copy settings between the ADFS servers. Certificates expire every 20 days, or when they are manually changed, so this script needs running by hand at or before these regular changes.

The second of these two issues though has been fixed in the June 2014 update for Windows Server 2012 R2. The fix is documented in http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2964735 and the update (the June 2014 update) is at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2962409

Changing AD FS 3.0 Certificates

Posted on 7 CommentsPosted in 2012, 2012 R2, ADFS, ADFS 3.0, certificates, IAmMEC, Office 365, WAP, Web Application Proxy

I am quite adept at configuring certificates and changing them around, but this one took me completely by surprise as it has a bunch of oddities to consider.

First the errors: Web Application Proxy (WAP) reported 0x80075213. In the event log the following:

The federation server proxy could not establish a trust with the Federation Service.

Additional Data
Exception details:
The underlying connection was closed: Could not establish trust relationship for the SSL/TLS secure channel.

User Action
Ensure that the credentials being used to establish a trust between the federation server proxy and the Federation Service are valid and that the Federation Service can be reached.

And

Unable to retrieve proxy configuration data from the Federation Service.

Additional Data

Trust Certificate Thumbprint:
431116CCF0AA65BB5DCCD9DD3BEE3DFF33AA4DBB

Status Code:
Exception details:
System.Net.WebException: The underlying connection was closed: The connection was closed unexpectedly.
at System.Net.HttpWebRequest.GetResponse()
at Microsoft.IdentityServer.Management.Proxy.StsConfigurationProvider.GetStsProxyConfiguration()

This was ultimately caused by the certificate on the AD FS Server having been replaced in the user interface, but this did not replace the certificate that HTTP was using or the published web applications and the certificates they were using.

So here are the steps to fix this issue:

AD FS Server

  1. Ensure the certificate is installed in the computer store of all the AD FS servers in the farm
  2. Grant permissions to the digital certificate to the ADFS Service account. Do this by right-clicking the new digital certificate in the MMC snap-in for certificates and choosing All Tasks > Manage Private Keys. Grant read permission to the service account that ADFS is using (you need to click Object Types and select Service Accounts to be able to select this user). Repeat for each server in the farm.
  3. In the AD FS management console expand service > certificates and ensure that the service communications certificate is correct and that the date is valid.
  4. Open this certificate by double-clicking it and on the Details tab, check the value for the Thumbprint.
  5. Start PowerShell on the AD FS Server and run Get-AdfsSslCertificate (not Get-AdfsCertificate). You should get back a few rows of data listing localhost and your federation service name along with a PortNumber and CertificateHash. Make sure the CertificateHash matches the Thumbprint for the service communications certificate.
  6. If they do not, then run Set-AdfsSslCertificate -Thumbprint XXXXXX (where XXXXX is the thumbprint value without spaces).
  7. Then you need to restart the ADFS Server.
  8. Repeat for each member of the farm, taking them out and in from any load balancer configuration you have. Ensure any SSL certs on the load balancer are updated as well.

Web Application Proxy

  1. Ensure the certificate is installed in the computer store of the web application proxy server as well. Permissions do not need to be set for this service.
  2. Run Get-WebApplicationProxySslCertificate. You should get back a few rows of data listing localhost and your federation service name along with a PortNumber and CertificateHash. Make sure the CertificateHash matches the Thumbprint for the service communications certificate. If it does not use Set-WebApplicationProxySslCertificate -Thumbprint XXXXX to change it. Here XXXXX is the thumbprint value without spaces.
  3. Restart WAP server and it should now connect to the AD FS endpoint and everything should be working again.
  4. Check that each Web Proxy Application is using the new certificate. Do this with Get-WebApplicationProxyApplication | Set-WebApplicationProxyApplication -ExternalCertificateThumbprint XXXXXX (where XXXXX is the thumbprint value without spaces). This sets all your applications to use the same certificate. If you have different certificates in use, then do them one by one with Get-WebApplicationProxyApplication | Format-Table Name,ExternalCert* to see what the existing thumbprints are and then Get-WebApplicationProxyApplication “name” | Set-WebApplicationProxyApplication -ExternalCertificateThumbprint XXXXXX to do just the one called “name”.