Azure Information Protection General Troubleshooting

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in aadrm, AIP, Azure Information Protection, encryption, IAmMEC, Office 365, rms

Azure Information Protection (AIP) is the new name, and new features for Azure Rights Management. Azure Information Protection allows a company to create a series of labels to apply to documents and to have those documents tags and labelled. For example a watermark or header is easy to set in the Azure Information Protection management blade in portal.azure.com.

In fact its so easy to turn on I did just that. The actual work and business consulting with Azure Information Protection is the why and business reasons for using it rather than the technical steps to enable it.

So once I enabled it and the client installed I found that I had a banner toolbar in Office applications as shown:

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Clicking any of the labels will perform the default function of the product. These can be modified in the Azure Portal as shown:

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The above two graphics show one example label (Confidential) that has had a sub label added (called NBConsult UK). The larger image above shows the details for this “NBConsult UK” label. In the properties blade for the label you can see I have turned on a template from RMS.

Once the changes are made and saved, you can publish the changes. Clients will pick up these changes on restarting the client application.

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And then started my issues and the steps to troubleshoot this. First I got the following prompt twice:

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Followed by:

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And so I was finding my documents did not get the RMS based labels applied.

Reasons why this might be the case can be checked using the RMS tool in the Office application. So I tried to protect the document manually via File > Info tab:

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This worked – I had the rights to use the template in the application – just AIP could not apply the template via the AIP tool.

To fix this I ran the Azure Information Protection (AIP) diagnostics tool. To get this click the AIP lock icon and choose Help and Feedback from the menu:

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From this a popup appears:

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And from this choose Run diagnostics:

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Let the tool complete. I got the following errors before the application failed (crashed) and then did not complete again if left it again

image and then image

To get around this issue, as the reset option to fix the AIP application in the diagnostics tool was not available due to the application crash, I followed the steps in http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/19251.ad-rms-troubleshooting-reset-the-client-msipc.aspx to bootstrap the client manually. If the AIP diag client completes, fix the listed issue or choose Reset in the client.

Once I had deleted the files and related registry keys mentioned in the above website I could restart any Office application. The RMS certs, keys and settings where downloaded to the client again and the AIP client was able to protect a document where as before it was not:

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Enabling Microsoft Rights Management in SharePoint Online

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in aadrm, active directory, cloud, IAmMEC, Office 365, policy, rms, sharepoint

This article is the fifth in a series of posts looking at Microsoft’s new Rights Management product set. In an earlier previous post we looked at turning on the feature in Office 365 and in this post we will look at protecting documents in SharePoint. This means your cloud users and will have their data protected just by saving it to a document library.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

To enable SharePoint Online to integrate with Microsoft Rights Management you need to turn on RMS in SharePoint. You do this with the following steps:

  1. Go to service settings, click sites, and then click View site collections and manage additional settings in the SharePoint admin center:
    image
  2. Click settings and find Information Rights Management (IRM) in the list:
    image
  3. Select Use the IRM service specified in your configuration and click Refresh IRM Settings:
    image
  4. Click OK

Once this is done, you can now enable selected document libraries for RMS protection.

  1. Find the document library that you want to enforce RMS protection upon and click the PAGE tab to the top left of the SharePoint site (under the Office 365 logo).
    image
  2. Then click Library Settings:
    image
  3. If the site is not a document library, for example the picture below shows a “document center” site you will not see the Library Settings option. For these sites, navigate to the document library specifically and click the LIBRARY tab and then choose Library Settings:
    image
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  4. Click Information Rights Management
    image
  5. Select Restrict permissions on this library on download and add your policy title and policy description. Click SHOW OPTIONS to configure additional RMS settings on the library, and then click OK.
    image
  6. The additional options allow you to enforce restrictions to the document library such as RMS key caching (for offline use) and to allow the document to be shared with a group of users. This group must be mail enabled (or at least have an email address in its email address attribute) and be synced to the cloud.

To start using the RMS functionality in SharePoint, upload a document to this library or create a new document in the library. Then download the document again – it will now be RMS protected.

Creating Microsoft Rights Management Templates and Policies

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in aadrm, active directory, Office 365, rms

This article is the sixth in a series of posts looking at Microsoft’s new Rights Management product set. In the previous post we looked at turning on the feature in Office 365 and in a later post we will see how to integrate this into your on-premises servers. In this post we will look at how to add templates to Microsoft Rights Management so that you can protect content with options other than the two default templates of “Company – Confidential” and “Company – Confidential View Only”. In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

One of the most requested features of Microsoft Right Management (that which used to be called Azure RMS) is custom templates. Custom templates let you define the protection policies you would like to roll out within your organization. Whether your organization is using Azure RMS in as part of your on premises deployment (via the RMS connector) or as part of Office 365, you can now do this via the Azure Management Portal.

First thing though is you (currently) need an Azure subscription. To get an Azure subscription you need a credit card, even though you are doing something in Azure that is not charged for. If all you do in Azure is what is in this blog then the card will never be charged – but as you can do so much you will probably not do just what is here in the blog. Note though that if you are doing this for lab and testing purposes, you will still need a credit card, but you cannot use the same card for more than one subscription. This is awkward, as it means each client I set this up for needs to provision their own lab tenant for me and then grant me permissions. A free Azure showing just the free features and no credit card requirement would be very useful. So to create your Microsoft Rights Management custom templates login to Azure at https://manage.windowsazure.com and sign up if necessary. Make sure you login with the same Office 365 global administrator account that you used when you where enabling RMS in Office 365.

  1. Do not sign in with your Microsoft ID (ex Live ID), always sign in here with your Organizational ID.
  2. Scroll down the left of the management screen and click Active Directory.
  3. To use Microsoft Rights Management you must have synced your on-premises Active Directory to Azure Active Directory and you can manage AD from here now as another free feature of this subscription you have created.
  4. Select Rights Management on the main screen:
    image
  5. Click your company name and then in the getting started screen select Manage your rights policy templates. You will see the two default templates of “Company – Confidential” and “Company – Confidential View Only”.
    image

These two templates protect content so that it can only be seen by members of your company (that is, users who’s account is synced to your Azure Active Directory tenant from your on-premises Active Directory). The “Company – Confidential” is editable by anyone in the company but cannot be opened if you are outside the company. The “Company – Confidential View Only” template is used to protect content that you want people in your company to view, but not edit. Again this is not viewable for users who do not have a login at your company. With the custom templates that you can now add you can designate different groups of users that will have access to documents protected with these templates, and you can define an access level or a list of rights for each of these groups. You can also control for how long content protected with these templates will be accessible, and you can define whether you want to require users to be online to access the content (thus, getting maximum control over their ability to access the document in case your policies change over time and ensuring all accesses to the documents get logged) or you want to allow them to cache document licenses so they get the ability to access the content from disconnected locations for up to a defined period of time.

To begin the process click Add on the bottom of the management web page and fill in the details required:
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Though you can have any name and description, the recommendation is to have a short enough list that your users can scan easily and that contains the company name and a brief outline of the rights granted. The following might be good example names:

  • Contoso – Board Level Confidential (Grants access to company board level staff only)
  • Contoso – All Full Time Employees Only (Visible to all Full Time Employees only)
  • Contoso – Legal Time Sensitive View Only (Grants the legal team online access to document for 7 days)

The name of the template appears in the yellow banner at the top of the application, so should clearly identify who can view and what they can do with the document. You can also set different languages. Applications will pick the most suitable language version, with US English being the top of the list as downloaded from Microsoft and so the version that appears if your specific language does not appear. Tick the circle and the template is added. The management console returns with “Successfully added the template. Clients won’t see the changes until they refresh their templates”. Note though that templates start their life as “archived” templates that cannot be used, but this is fine, as we have not finished configuring the template anyway. Click on the name of the template to get to the properties pages for the template. You will be presented with the “Quick Start” page:
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Click “Get started” under “Configure rights for users and groups” to say which groups or users from your Active Directory can access the content protected with this template. This info is synced from your AD every three hours – so any new users or groups will appear in a short while: image

Keep in mind that your groups must have an email address for you to be able to use them in a custom template. If the group cannot be selected that will be the reason, but also remember the previous comment about a three hour sync from AD.

So if you do mail enable a group on-premises, it will be a good idea to continue creating this template now and then returning in a number of hours and adding the additional groups and rights. Select the rights you wish to apply to content protected with this template:
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Once the rights are added for the groups/users selected you can add additional groups and users with different rights. To add additional names and descriptions (in different languages) click Configure on the top menu bar:
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And if your template has content expiration settings, these too can be set under Configure:
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And finally, before you publish your template, you need to decide if you content can only be viewed online (that is with a connection to Microsoft RMS) or if you are allowed to cache the rights to open the content and if so, how long you can cache those rights for:
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At the top of the Configure screen select Publish to make a template accessible to users (or Archive to restrict access to it again, and of course all the content protected by the template). Save the template. Clients will be able to use the template to protect their content once they have updated their templates.

For example Exchange Server will refresh its templates every 30 minutes from the RMS Connector and OWA will show them at next login, but if you are running Exchange Online you need to refresh the templates manually. See http://technet.microsoft.com/library/dn642472.aspx#BKMK_RefreshingTemplates for the steps to refresh different clients and servers.

Configuring Exchange On-Premises to Use Azure Rights Management

Posted on 7 CommentsPosted in 2010, 2013, 64 bit, aadrm, ADFS, ADFS 2.0, DLP, DNS, exchange, exchange online, https, hybrid, IAmMEC, load balancer, loadbalancer, mcm, mcsm, MVP, Office 365, powershell, rms, sharepoint, warm

This article is the fifth in a series of posts looking at Microsoft’s new Rights Management product set. In an earlier previous post we looked at turning on the feature in Office 365 and in this post we will look at enabling on-premises Exchange Servers to use this cloud based RMS server. This means your cloud users and your on-premises users can shared encrypted content and as it is cloud based, you can send encrypted content to anyone even if you are not using an Office 365 mailbox.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

Exchange Server integrates very nicely with on-premises RMS servers. To integrate Exchange on-premises with Windows Azure Rights Management you need to install a small service online that can connect Exchange on-premises to the cloud RMS service. On-premises file servers (classification) and SharePoint can also use this service to integrate themselves with cloud RMS.

You install this small service on-premises on servers that run Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012, or Windows Server 2008 R2. After you install and configure the connector, it acts as a communications interface between the on-premises IRM-enabled servers and the cloud service. The service can be downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40839

From this download link there are three files to get onto the server you are going to use for the connector.

  • RMSConnectorSetup.exe (the connector server software)
  • GenConnectorConfig.ps1 (this automates the configuration of registry settings on your Exchange and SharePoint servers)
  • RMSConnectorAdminToolSetup_x86.exe (needed if you want to configure the connector from a 32bit client)

Once you have all this software (or that which you need) and you install it then IT and users can easily protect documents and pictures both inside your organization and outside, without having to install additional infrastructure or establish trust relationships with other organizations.

The overview of the structure of the link between on-premises and Windows Azure Rights Management is as follows:

IC721938

Notice therefore that there are some prerequisites needed. You need to have an Office 365 tenant and turn on Windows Azure Rights Management. Once you have this done you need the following:

  • Get your Office 365 tenant up and running
  • Configure Directory Synchronization between on-premises Active Directory and Windows Azure Active Directory (the Office 365 DirSync tool)
  • It is also recommended (but not required) to enable ADFS for Office 365 to avoid having to login to Windows Azure Rights Management when creating or opening protected content.
  • Install the connector
  • Prepare credentials for configuring the software.
  • Authorising the server for connecting to the service
  • Configuring load balancing to make this a highly available service
  • Configuring Exchange Server on-premises to use the connector

Installing the Connector Service

  1. You need to set up an RMS administrator. This administrator is either the a specific user object in Office 365 or all the members of a security group in Office 365.
    1. To do this start PowerShell and connect to the cloud RMS service by typing Import-Module aadrm and then Connect-AadrmService.
    2. Enter your Office 365 global administrator username and password
    3. Run Add-AadrmRoleBasedAdministrator -EmailAddress <email address> -Role “GlobalAdministrator” or Add-AadrmRoleBasedAdministrator -SecurityGroupDisplayName <group Name> -Role “ConnectorAdministrator”. If the administrator object does not have an email address then you can lookup the ObjectID in Get-MSOLUser and use that instead of the email address.
  2. Create a namespace for the connector on any DNS namespace that you own. This namespace needs to be reachable from your on-premises servers, so it could be your .local etc. AD domain namespace. For example rmsconnector.contoso.local and an IP address of the connector server or load balancer VIP that you will use for the connector.
  3. Run RMSConnectorSetup.exe on the server you wish to have as the service endpoint on premises. If you are going to make a highly available solutions, then this software needs installing on multiple machines and can be installed in parallel. Install a single RMS connector (potentially consisting of multiple servers for high availability) per Windows Azure RMS tenant. Unlike Active Directory RMS, you do not have to install an RMS connector in each forest. Select to install the software on this computer:
    IC001
  4. Read and accept the licence agreement!
  5. Enter your RMS administrator credentials as configured in the first step.
  6. Click Next to prepare the cloud for the installation of the connector.
  7. Once the cloud is ready, click Install. During the RMS installation process, all prerequisite software is validated and installed, Internet Information Services (IIS) is installed if not already present, and the connector software is installed and configured
    IC002
  8. If this is the last server that you are installing the connector service on (or the first if you are not building a highly available solution) then select Launch connector administrator console to authorize servers. If you are planning on installing more servers, do them now rather than authorising servers:
    IC003
  9. To validate the connector quickly, connect to http://<connectoraddress>/_wmcs/certification/servercertification.asmx, replacing <connectoraddress> with the server address or name that has the RMS connector installed. A successful connection displays a ServerCertificationWebService page.
  10. For and Exchange Server organization or SharePoint farm it is recommended to create a security group (one for each) that contains the security objects that Exchange or SharePoint is. This way the servers all get the rights needed for RMS with the minimal of administration interaction. Adding servers individually rather than to the group results in the same outcome, it just requires you to do more work. It is important that you authorize the correct object. For a server to use the connector, the account that runs the on-premises service (for example, Exchange or SharePoint) must be selected for authorization. For example, if the service is running as a configured service account, add the name of that service account to the list. If the service is running as Local System, add the name of the computer object (for example, SERVERNAME$).
    1. For servers that run Exchange: You must specify a security group and you can use the default group (DOMAIN\Exchange Servers) that Exchange automatically creates and maintains of all Exchange servers in the forest.
    2. For SharePoint you can use the SERVERNAME$ object, but the recommendation configuration is to run SharePoint by using a manually configured service account. For the steps for this see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn375964.aspx.
    3. For file servers that use File Classification Infrastructure, the associated services run as the Local System account, so you must authorize the computer account for the file servers (for example, SERVERNAME$) or a group that contains those computer accounts.
  11. Add all the required groups (or servers) to the authorization dialog and then click close. For Exchange Servers, they will get SuperUser rights to RMS (to decrypt content):
    image
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  12. If you are using a load balancer, then add all the IP addresses of the connector servers to the load balancer under a new virtual IP and publish it for TCP port 80 (and 443 if you want to configure it to use certificates) and equally distribute the data across all the servers. No affinity is required. Add a health check for the success of a HTTP or HTTPS connection to http://<connectoraddress>/_wmcs/certification/servercertification.asmx so that the load balancer fails over correctly in the event of connector server failure.
  13. To use SSL (HTTPS) to connect to the connector server, on each server that runs the RMS connector, install a server authentication certificate that contains the name that you will use for the connector. For example, if your RMS connector name that you defined in DNS is rmsconnector.contoso.com, deploy a server authentication certificate that contains rmsconnector.contoso.com in the certificate subject as the common name. Or, specify rmsconnector.contoso.com in the certificate alternative name as the DNS value. The certificate does not have to include the name of the server. Then in IIS, bind this certificate to the Default Web Site.
  14. Note that any certificate chains or CRL’s for the certificates in use must be reachable.
  15. If you use proxy servers to reach the internet then see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn375964.aspx for steps on configuring the connector servers to reach the Windows Azure Rights Management cloud via a proxy server.
  16. Finally you need to configure the Exchange or SharePoint servers on premises to use Windows Azure Active Directory via the newly installed connector.
    • To do this you can either download and run GenConnectorConfig.ps1 on the server you want to configure or use the same tool to generate Group Policy script or a registry key script that can be used to deploy across multiple servers.
    • Just run the tool and at the prompt enter the URL that you have configured in DNS for the connector followed by the parameter to make the local registry settings or the registry files or the GPO import file. Enter either http:// or https:// in front of the URL depending upon whether or not SSL is in use of the connectors IIS website.
    • For example .\GenConnectorConfig.ps1 –ConnectorUri http://rmsconnector.contoso.com -SetExchange2013 will configure a local Exchange 2013 server
  17. If you have lots of servers to configure then run the script with –CreateRegEditFiles or –CreateGPOScript along with –ConnectorUri. This will make five reg files (for Exchange 2010 or 2013, SharePoint 2010 or 2013 and the File Classification service). For the GPO option it will make one GPO import script.
  18. Note that the connector can only be used by Exchange Server 2010 SP3 RU2 or later or Exchange 2013 CU3 or later. The OS on the server also needs to be include a version of the RMS client that supports RMS Cryptographic Mode 2. This is Windows Server 2008 + KB2627272 or Windows Server 2008 R2 + KB2627273 or Windows Server 2012 or Windows Server 2012 R2.
  19. For Exchange Server you need to manually enable IRM as you would do if you had an on-premises RMS server. This is covered in http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd351212.aspx but in brief you run Set-IRMConfiguration -InternalLicensingEnabled $true. The rest, such as transport rules and OWA and search configuration is covered in the mentioned TechNet article.
  20. Finally you can test if RMS is working with Test-IRMConfiguration –Sender billy@contoso.com. You should get a message at the end of the test saying Pass.
  21. If you have downloaded GenConnectorConfig.ps1 before May 1st 2014 then download it again, as the version before this date writes the registry keys incorrectly and you get errors such as “FAIL: Failed to verify RMS version. IRM features require AD RMS on Windows Server 2008 SP2 with the hotfixes specified in Knowledge Base article 973247” and “Microsoft.Exchange.Security.RightsManagement.RightsManagementException: Failed to get Server Info from http://rmsconnector.contoso.com/_wmcs/certification/server.asmx. —> System.Net.WebException: The request failed with HTTP status 401: Unauthorized.”. If you get these then turn of IRM, delete the “C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\DRM\Server” folder to remove old licences, delete the registry keys and run the latest version of GetConnectorConfig.ps1, refresh the RMS keys with Set-IRMConfiguration –RefreshServerCertificates and reset IIS with IISRESET.

Now you can encrypt messages on-premises using your AADRM licence and so not require RMS Server deployed locally.

Enabling and Configuring AADRM in Exchange Online

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2010, 2013, aadrm, exchange, exchange online, IAmMEC, mcm, mcsm, Office 365, rms

This article is the fourth in a series of posts looking at Microsoft’s new Rights Management product set. In the previous post we looked at turning on the feature in Office 365 and in this post we will look at how to manage the service in the cloud.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

Once you have turned on Azure Active Directory rights management you need to enable it in a variety of locations based on your needs. This series of blog posts will look at doing that in both Exchange and SharePoint, both online in Office 365 and on-premises as well as for desktop users and mobile and tablet users. First we will start with Exchange Online.

Exchange Online configuration for AADRM is probably the most complex one to do, and its not that complex really! To enable AADRM for Exchange Online at the time of writing you need to import the RMS Key from AADRM. If you had installed AD RMS on premises then you might have already done this for Exchange Online to integrate it with your on-premises RMS infrastructure – if this is the case, don’t change the key online or it will break. These steps are for Exchange Online users who have never used or integrated AD RMS with Exchange on-premises.

Enabling AADRM in Exchange Online

  1. Enable AADRM in your Office 365 tenant as mentioned previously
  2. Set the RMS Key Sharing URL to the correct value as listed in http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn151475(v=exchg.150).aspx
  3. For example, to set this if your Office 365 tenant is based in the EU you would use the following PowerShell cmdlet in a remote session connected to Exchange Online:
  4. Then import the keys and templates for your tenant from the AADRM servers online. The keys and templates are known as the Trusted Publishing Domain. This is done in a remote PowerShell session connected to Exchange Online using the following cmdlet:
    • Import-RMSTrustedPublishingDomain -RMSOnline -name “RMS Online”
  5. In the PowerShell response to the previous command you should see the AddedTemplates value read “Company Name – Confidential” and “Company Name – Confidential View Only” which are the default two templates. If customised templates have been created and published, they will appear here as well.
  6. To check that the key/template import has worked run Test-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnline from the Exchange Online remote PowerShell command prompt. You should see PASS listed at the end of the output.
  7. Finally, to turn on IRM protection in Exchange Online run Set-IRMConfiguration –InternalLicensingEnabled $true from an Exchange Online remote PowerShell session.

Configuring AADRM in Exchange Online

  1. Once IRM is enabled with Set-IRMConfiguration –InternalLicensingEnabled $true you can run Get-IRMConfiguration and you will see the following options are enabled. You can turn any of these off (and on again) as your require:
    • JournalReportDecryptionEnabled: Ensures the IRM protected messages stored in an Exchange Journal report are also stored in the same report in clear text.
    • ClientAccessServerEnabled: Enables OWA to offer IRM protection during email composing (click the ellipsis (…) in the new email compose screen and select set permissions menu). OWA will also prelicence IRM protected content so that OWA users can open content they are licenced to view etc. without needing to have access to the RMS infrastructure directly. Note that during testing I found it could take up to 24 hours for Exchange Online to show the RMS templates in OWA. [RMS011]
    • SearchEnabled: When you search your mailbox for content, anything that is IRM protected will appear in your search results if it matches the search keyword. This setting allows Exchange Search to open and index your content even if it is not listed as a valid user of the content.
    • TransportDecryptionSetting: This allows the transport pipeline in Exchange to decrypt content so that it is available for transport agents to view it. For example anti-malware agents and transport rules. The content is reprotected at the end of the transport pipeline before it leaves the server.
    • EDiscoverySuperUserEnabled: Allows discovery search administrators to query for keywords in your protected content even if they would not be able to directly open the content if they had access to your mailbox or if they found the email saved to a file share of other sharing location.

What the RMS Settings in Exchange Actually Do

JournalReportDecryptionEnabled

Enabling journal report decryption allows the Journaling agent to attach a decrypted copy of a rights-protected message to the journal report. Before you enable journal report decryption, you must add the Federated Delivery mailbox to the super users group configured on your Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS) server or AADRM settings.

Note: This is currently not working in Exchange Online and the above instructions are for Exchange On-Premises deployments.

ClientAccessServerEnabled

When IRM is enabled on Client Access servers, Outlook Web App users can IRM-protect messages by applying an Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS) template created on your AD RMS cluster or AADRM service. Outlook Web App users can also view IRM-protected messages and supported attachments. Before you enable IRM on Client Access servers, you must add the Federation mailbox to the super users group on the AD RMS cluster or AADRM service as this allows the server to decrypt all content for you on the server so that the user does not need to have to have access to the RMS or AADRM service.

With CAS being able to licence and get licences on your behalf from the RMS service, you have the ability to do RMS inside OWA, and even if you are offline in OWA then any protected content already comes with its licence and so can be read without a connection to the RMS service.

SearchEnabled

The SearchEnabled parameter specifies whether to enable searching of IRM-encrypted messages in Outlook Web App.

TransportDecryptionSetting

The TransportDecryptionSettingparameter specifies the transport decryption configuration. Valid values include one of the following:

  • Disabled   Transport decryption is disabled for internal and external messages.
  • Mandatory   Messages that can’t be decrypted are rejected, and a non-delivery report (NDR) is returned.
  • Optional   A best effort approach to decryption is provided. Messages are decrypted if possible, but delivered even if decryption fails.

Transport decryption allows RMS protected messages to be decrypted as they are processed on the Exchange Server and then encrypted again before they leave the server. This means transport agents such as anti virus or transport rules can process the message (i.e. scan for viruses or add signatures or do DLP processing) the message as they see it in its unencrypted form.

EDiscoverySuperUserEnabled

The EDiscoverySuperUserEnabledparameter specifies whether members of the Discovery Management role group can access IRM-protected messages that were returned by a discovery search and are residing in a discovery mailbox. To enable IRM-protected message access to the Discovery Management role group, set the value to $true.

Managing Azure Active Directory Rights Management

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 2013, aadrm, dirsync, encryption, IAmMEC, journal, journaling, licence, mcm, mcsm, MVP, Office 365, rms, transport agent

This article is the third in a series of posts looking at Microsoft’s new Rights Management product set. In the previous post we looked at turning on the feature in Office 365 and in this post we will look at how to manage the service in the cloud.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

Once you have signed up for the Azure Active Directory Rights Management (AADRM) Service there are a few things that you need to manage. These are:

  • The service itself
  • Users who are allowed to create RMS protected content
  • Enable and configure Super User rights if required.

Managing AADRM

There is not a lot to do in the Office 365 admin web pages with regard to the management of the service apart from enabling it, which we covered in the previous post and disabling it. Disabling the service involves the same steps as enabling it – you just click the big deactivate button!

AADRM can be further managed with PowerShell though. There are lots of blog posts on connecting to Office 365 using PowerShell, and some of those include the cmdlets to connect to Exchange Online etc. as well. The code below adds to this, and loads the AADRM module and connects to AADRM service in the cloud.

$cred = Get-Credential

write-host "Username: " $cred.username

Connect-MsolService -Credential $cred

Write-Host "...connected to Office 365 Windows Azure Active Directory"

$s = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell -Credential $cred -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection

$importresults = Import-PSSession $s -Verbose

Write-Host "...connected to Exchange Online"

Import-Module AADRM

Connect-AadrmService -Verbose -Credential $cred

If you save the above PowerShell code as a text file with a .ps1 extension then you can run the script and easily connect to Office 365 with the credentials you enter. Then connect to Exchange Online with the same set of credentials and finally to AADRM with, of course, the same credentials. This allows you to manages users, email and security from a single session.

To get the AADRM PowerShell module on your computer (so that Import-Module AADRM works) you need to download the Rights Management PowerShell administration module from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257721 and then install it.

To install you need to have already installed the Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant 7.0 and PowerShell 2.0. The PowerShell config file needs some settings adding to it, though I found on my Windows 8 PC that these had already been done. See the instructions at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj585012.aspx for this change to the config file.

  1. Run a PowerShell session and load the module with
    1. Import-Module AADRM
    2. Connect-AadrmService -Verbose
  2. Login when prompted with a user with Global Admin rights in Office 365.
  3. Or, use the script above to do Office 365, Exchange Online and AADRM in a single console.
  4. Run Get-Aadrm to check that the service is enabled

Enabling Super User Rights

Super Users in RMS are accounts that have the ability to decrypt any content protected with that RMS system. You do not need Super User rights to use RMS, nor do you need anyone who has Super User rights to use the product. But there are times when it might be required. One example would be during a discovery or compliance process. At this time it might be required that someone is able to open any RMS protected document to look for hits on the compliance issue in question. Super User gives that right, but would be needed just for the duration of the task that requires these rights. Rights to be Super User would be granted as needed and very importantly removed as needed.

Another example for the use of Super User is when a process needs to see content in its unprotected form. The common use case for this is Exchange Server and its transport decryption process. In Exchange Server you have agents that run against each message looking for something and then acting if that something is found. For example you would not want an virus to bypass the built in AV features of Exchange Server 2013 by protecting it with RMS! Or if you had a disclaimer transport rule or agent, you would not want the disclaimer or DLP feature to not see the content and act upon it because the content was encrypted. The same goes for journaling and the ability to journal a clear text copy of the message as well as the encrypted one if you wish.

To do all this in Exchange Server, the RMS Super User feature needs to be enabled and we will come back in a later post on the specifics of doing that for Exchange, but first we need to enable it in AARMS and set the users who will be Super Users and then, when we are finished with whatever required Super User, we need to turn it off again.

The Rights Management super users group is a special group that has full control over all rights-protected content managed by the Rights Management service. Its members are granted full owner rights in all use licenses that are issued by the subscriber organization for which the super users group is configured. This means that members of this group can decrypt any rights-protected content file and remove rights-protection from it for content previously protected within that organization.

By default, the super users feature is not enabled and no groups or users are assigned membership to it. To turn on the feature run Enable-AadrmSuperUserFeature from the AADRM PowerShell console. The opposite cmdlets exists to turn the feature off again – Disable-AadrmSuperUserFeature!

Once it is enabled you can set Office 365 users as Super Users. To do this run Add-AadrmSuperUser –EmailAddress user@domain.com where the user is either a cloud only Office 365 account or one that you have pushed to Office 365 using DirSync from your on-premises Active Directory. You can add more than one user, each user is added as a separate running of the cmdlets.

To see your list of Super Users, run Get-AadrmSuperUser. To remove users either take them out one by one (Remove-AadrmSuperUser –EmailAddress user@tenant.onmicrosoft.com) or just turn off the Super User feature with Disable-AadrmSuperUserFeature.

Adding AADRM Licences to Users

Once you have AADRM activated you can give your users the rights to create protected content. This is done in the licencing page of the Office 365 web admin portal or via PowerShell. The steps for adding user licences in the shell are discussed at http://c7solutions.com/2011/07/assign-specific-licences-in-office-365-html. That article was written some time ago, so the following are the changes for AADRM:

  • The SkuPartNumber for AADRM is RIGHTSMANAGEMENT_ADHOC
  • The Service Plan for the AADRM SKU is RMS_S_ADHOC

Turning on Azure Active Directory Rights Management

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in aadrm, Office 365, rms

This article is the second in a series of articles about protecting and sharing your content no matter where it is and how you made it. To protect your content so it can be used by those that you allow alone you need to assign rights to it. Here we are going to look at Windows Azure Active Directory Rights Management, or AADRM, or “the new RMS” to do this.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the articles are released – so check back or leave a comment to the first post in the series and I will let you know when new content is added.

To use and protect our content for any of the scenarios described in the following articles we need to sign up for AADRM and activate it. If you are an Office 365 E3 or E4 subscriber then you have done the signup already.

Signup and activate AADRM

  1. Sign into Office 365 as a global administrator or create a new Office 365 Enterprise trial
  2. Once in the Office 365 portal check you have an Azure Active Directory Rights Management subscription
    RMS001
    • If you have an E3 or E4 subscription you will have this already – to see the licence
      1. Click licencing on the left
      2. OR click purchase services on the left and view current subscriptions on the right.
    • If you do not have these licences or subscription levels, then you can purchase (and a trial is available) a AADRM subscription for as many users as are needed.
      1. To add an AADRM trial click purchase services on the left and search for Azure Active Directory Rights Management in the list and add the trial or make the purchase.
      2. If you do not have a Microsoft partner helping you with this deployment then use 1019411 as your Microsoft Partner info.
  3. Click service settings on the left and rights management on the top of the right-hand pane
  4. Click Manage. You will be taken to the Windows Azure Active Directory admin pages where you will need to activate Rights Management
    RMS002
  5. Confirm you want to activate Rights Management
    RMS003
  6. Rights Management is activated a few seconds later.

The New Rights Management Service

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in aadrm, active directory, certificates, cloud, compliance, dirsync, exchange, exchange online, https, hybrid, journal, journaling, mcm, mcsm, microsoft, Office 365, Outlook, pki, policy, rms, smarthost, transport, unified messaging, voicemail

This blog is the start of a series of articles I will write over the next few months on how to ensure that your data is encrypted and secured to only the people you want to access it, and only for the level of rights you want to give them.

The technology that we will look at to do this is Microsoft’s recently released Windows Azure Active Directory Rights Management product, also known as AADRM or Microsoft Rights Management, or “the new RMS”.

In this series of articles we will look at the following:

The items above will get lit up as the article is released – so check back or leave a comment to this post and I will let you know when new content is added to this series.

What is “rights management”

Simply this is the ability to ensure that your content is only used by whom you want it to be used by and only for what you grant. Its known in various guises, and the most common guise is Digital Rights Management (DRM) as applied to the music and films you have been downloading for years.

With the increase in sharing music and other mp3 content in the last ten plus years, the recording companies and music sellers started to protect music. It did not go down well, and I would say this is mainly because the content was bought and so the owner wanted to do with it as they liked – even if what they liked was legal they were limited from doing so. I have music I bought that I cannot use because the music retailer is out of business or I tried to transfer it too many times. I now buy all my music DRM free.

But if the content is something I created and sold, rather than something I bought I see it very differently. When the program was running I was one of the instructors for the Microsoft Certified Master program. I wrote and delivered part of the Exchange Server training. And following the reuse of my and other peoples content outside of the classroom, the content was rights protected – it could be read only by those who I had taught. Those I taught think differently about this, but usually because the management of getting a new copy of the content when it expires!

But this is what rights management is, and this series of articles will look at enabling Azure Active Directory Rights Management, a piece of Office 365 that if you are an E3 or E4 subscriber then you already have, and if you have a lower level of subscription or none at all you can buy for £2/user/month and this will allow you to protect the content that you create, that it can be used by only those you want to read it (regardless of where you or they put it) and if you want it can expire after a given time.

In this series we will look at enabling the service and connecting various technologies to it, from our smartphones to PC’s to servers and then distributing our protected content to whom needs to see it. Those who receive it will be able to use the content for free. You only pay to create protected content. We will also look at protecting content automatically, for example content that is classified in a given way by Windows Server or emails that match certain conditions (for example they contain credit cards or other personally identifiable information (PII) information such as passport or tax IDs) and though I am not a SharePoint guru, we will look at protecting content downloaded from SharePoint document libraries.

Finally we will look at users protecting their own content – either the photographs they take on their phones of information they need to share (documents, aka using the phones camera as a scanner) or taking photos of whiteboards in meetings where the contents on the board should not be shared too widely.

Stick around – its a new technology and its going to have a big impact on the way we share data, regardless of whether we share it with Dropbox or the like or email or whatever comes next.